Boy Scouts of America

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Boy Scouts of America Reviews

Updated 9 October 2014
Updated 9 October 2014
224 Reviews
3.2
224 Reviews
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Recommend to a friend
Approve of CEO
Boy Scouts of America Chief Scout Executive Wayne Brock
Wayne Brock
69 Ratings

Review Highlights

Pros
  • It feels like you really make a difference (in 13 reviews)

  • Positive mission, great volunteers, amazing network of support (in 13 reviews)


Cons
  • Ultimately I left to achieve a better work life balance for my family's sake (in 16 reviews)

  • Hours can be real long and there are many nights and weekends (in 14 reviews)

More Highlights

Employee Reviews

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  1.  

    It's the people that made it not that worthwhile

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Systems Engineer in New York, NY (US)
    Former Employee - Systems Engineer in New York, NY (US)

    I worked at Boy Scouts of America full-time (more than an year)

    Pros

    You feel like you're one of them even if you're just an IT person. You can come out to their events.

    Cons

    The bosses (at that time) were not the most welcoming. At that time, things were shifting around so people were a little on edge to say the least.

    Recommends
    Approves of CEO
  2.  

    Can be both a career and a stepping stone.

    • Work/Life Balance
    Current Employee - Program Assistant
    Current Employee - Program Assistant

    I have been working at Boy Scouts of America part-time (more than 5 years)

    Pros

    Working with amazing children while trying to better the urban communities.
    Working for BSA is a great opportunity to work with some really amazing children. In my district, we work with less fortunate children that would not ordinarily get the opportunity to join Boy Scouts due to financial hardships or any other issues. This program is a bright point in the lives of a lot of children. Our program is just an introduction to the traditional BSA program, and we hope to have children continue in the Boy Scout traditional scouts.

    Cons

    In part time, there is no real chance of advancement. If you are in the council there are a lot of hours worked a week. There is a lot of fundraising involved, so you are definitely a salesperson, with the goal of "selling" your district to donors.

  3.  

    Love It

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Health Officer
    Former Employee - Health Officer

    I worked at Boy Scouts of America as a contractor (less than an year)

    Pros

    If you love the outdoors, nature, and youth development, it is for you!

    Cons

    Money. Pay is not the highest due to the amount of youth development.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    You have to be a go-getter.

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
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  5.  

    My job at camp trask (boy scouts of America) was to lead children/ adolescents into daily activities prescribed by camp

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Provisional Leader in Monrovia, CA (US)
    Former Employee - Provisional Leader in Monrovia, CA (US)

    I worked at Boy Scouts of America part-time (more than an year)

    Pros

    The perfect job for people that love the outdoors and I've to work with children ,it's the perfect summer job for teens and college students.

    Cons

    From my experience, there are no cons, especially if you love the outdoors although the mosquitos and bugs can get very annoying.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    I have no further advice to give, everyone's experience is different

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  6.  

    It is a fulfilling job for the right person but a drain on your home life.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - District Executive
    Current Employee - District Executive

    I have been working at Boy Scouts of America full-time (more than 3 years)

    Pros

    Positive mission, great volunteers, amazing network of support

    Cons

    Terrible home/life balance, poor compensation, poor management in many locations.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Be willing to adapt when necessary. With steadily declining membership changes must be made to reverse the trend and begin to grow and be relevant to more young people in America.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  7. 1 person found this helpful  

    Terrible pay, hours and treatment

    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at Boy Scouts of America

    Pros

    Giving kids an awesome program that they love. Coworkers are great

    Cons

    Treated terribly by management. They think we're their kids not employees. Worked a minimum of 16 hours a day 6 days a week for only $100/ week

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Get new management

  8. 1 person found this helpful  

    Love the mission but the District Executive job is utterly exhausting

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Atlanta, GA (US)
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Atlanta, GA (US)

    I worked at Boy Scouts of America full-time (more than 5 years)

    Pros

    Great training. Good benefits. Loved the retreats. Enjoyed working the golf tournaments and event fundraisers. Loved the volunteers and I am very passionate about the program. I learned a lot about leadership, fundraising, management, event planning, and life in general. Outstanding facilities and excellent programs.

    Cons

    Easily work 60-70 hours a week. Most of your weekends are required to be dedicated to Scouting. Some of the managers were yellers and screamed at employees. Constant turnover. DE's started at $38K while Scout Executive made $250K. To move up you really need to move around the country to different Councils for more opportunity. Does not seem worth it.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Not sure if they are even open to change. National members has been declining since the 1970s. The infrastructure needs to change for employees

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  9.  

    From dawn to dusk what the volunteer doesn't the DE must.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - District Executive
    Current Employee - District Executive

    I have been working at Boy Scouts of America full-time (more than an year)

    Pros

    There are several reasons to work for the Boy Scouts of America. I will list a few; satisfaction of giving back to your community, bettering the life of a youth that needs it, networking opportunities, working with youth, outdoor recreation, constantly changing work environment, set your own schedule, Insurance and benefits are some of the best, relocation to anywhere in the nation, choose who you want to work with, looked at as role model for the future leaders of the country, held to a higher standard, the ability to make a difference through the timeless values and morals of scouting and lots of opportunity for travel. It is a great way to gain valuable experience that you cannot achieve with any other organization. It is one of the most well known and reputable non-profit organizations in the world. It speaks tremendously for your character. I could go on and on about the value of some of the intrinsic benefits of working for the Boy Scouts of America.

    Cons

    There are several reasons to be weary of this position. If you are not willing to devote the majority of your time to the mission of this organization then this may not be the position for you. A District Executive has a very prestigious title, tremendous amounts of responsibility, and pay that is comparable being the assistant manager of a McDonald's. Be prepared to travel constantly. It is not unreasonable to travel 2-3 hours round trip for a 30 minute meeting or no meeting at all. The work life balance is very delicate and hard to achieve. You may find yourself working a few months without a full day away from scouting. While I believe the morals of Scouting are a keystone in society. It is very demanding and definitely not your typical 9-5. Everything else should take second place in order to be promoted. You are the vision and the direction of the movement. It is more of a calling or a mission than a job. You have to base your schedule around the schedule of the means to meet your goals and the schedules of the volunteers that you choose to work with. If you are not able to delegate tasks to the right volunteers you will fail or become burned out. Also, volunteers can and will be very difficult to work with in some situations. Some will throw you under the "Energy Bus" if you try to get off of their bus.Some volunteers resent you for being the paid professional and they think that they want your job. Your career will live and die by the volunteers. It is very important to place them wisely. The organization is very top heavy with management. The supervisory lines are sometimes unclear and counterproductive. The policies and paperwork are tremendous. Scouting as an organization is very effective at covering all of the bases to protect the brand. The database software is older than I am and not very user friendly. Change is a very slow and cumbersome process. Staff meetings are very repetitive and also seem counterproductive at times. You need to plan meetings to have other meetings to go to a conference to have more meetings. Also, you need paperwork for all of your paperwork. What I am saying is, the national business model is pretty effective and streamlined in theory. However, that theory may not translate effectively into the subcultures of the individual councils. At the end of the day it is the best job that you will ever love to hate. That is a quote that my district executive used to tell me when I asked him about the job. The high's are very high and short lived. The low's are very low and sometimes long lasting. You spend the majority of your time chasing high in the sky numbers and paperwork. It sometimes seems like the organization as a whole is losing sight of what really matters. To me what really matters is giving that youth an experience that he will take with him for the rest of his life and one day share the same experiences with his children through Scouting. Scouting is about creating a better america through timeless and tested values of the Scout oath and law. It is easy to lose sight of that in the membership projections and Fos campaigns. At the end of the day you couldn't pay me enough money in the world to do this job. That is why you cannot do it for the money or you might last 3 months. I do it because I believe in what the organization stands for and I wouldn't want to imagine a world without Scouting. Through the morals and values of the Scout Oath and Law my life has been forever changed for the better. I know what it has done for me. I know that it can do the same for someone else, for a youth in the community that needs it. It may not mean something to everyone, but to someone it means everything.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Innovation is key in today's ever changing "social media" society. Hire more field staff to better serve the youth of america. The "less is more" outlook on paid professional staff limits council efficiency and undermines maximum potential.

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  10.  

    Great working environment

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Waterfront Instructor in Avalon, CA (US)
    Former Employee - Waterfront Instructor in Avalon, CA (US)

    I worked at Boy Scouts of America as a contractor (more than 3 years)

    Pros

    Fun, meaningful interaction with scouts, lots of opportunity for promotion

    Cons

    Supervisor skill and competency level varied greatly

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Make the interview process much more rigorous

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  11.  

    Like taking a job aboard the Titanic.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - District Executive in Warner Robins, GA (US)
    Former Employee - District Executive in Warner Robins, GA (US)

    I worked at Boy Scouts of America full-time (less than an year)

    Pros

    Worst job experience I've ever had. Not really any pros to speak of, unless you count the fact I am no longer working there as a "pro." One of my volunteers, who was a former DE himself, told me this mantra for working for the BSA: "You're paid a pittance and treated like crap." I found this to be abundantly true.

    Cons

    First, they made me move to a new city, when there was an opening in the one I was already living. Didn't pay for my relocation. This was the first red flag that not all was right with the BSA, but I took the job anyway. Next, they told me they would send me to Texas for training after my 90 days...that came and went with no mention of this training. And I was never fully trained for my position there.

    Then I discovered that there is absolutely no work-life balance whatsoever. They expected you to be married to the job 24/7. Not uncommon to be in the office from 8am to 5pm, and then have meetings with your volunteers well into night. Like 9 or 10pm. Most work weeks I put to put in 70+ hours in, some weeks even inching close to 90. With no paid overtime. Lovely. Mind you, this was while being paid, with a Masters, 30k a year while management was making around 100k. If not more.

    Management? Horrible management; it was more like working for a petty dictatorship than a nonprofit. The CEO and CFO at my Council probably couldn't competently manage a lemonade stand let alone a million-dollar budget non-profit. Harassment was the currency of the realm; I was told more often than not what a horrible person I was by management for not meeting fundraising goals (that they set for me) than ever a slight "thanks" for doing something good. Often times I was brought into the CEO's office, told what I was doing wrong and when I tried to speak in my defense, I was told I wasn't allowed to speak.

    Criticizing an employee for not being able to do his job is one thing; never training that same employee and accusing him of not doing his job is a horse of a completely different color.

    Too much lip-service given to the Scout Oath, Law and Christian values while no one really acted upon it. Never seen a bigger group of holier-than-thou people walking around, telling everyone how great and religious they were while actively sabotaging and backstabbing their volunteers and coworkers. I've seen monks less pious than people who worked at this Council.

    I was also told I was going to have to join the Order of the Arrow, I had no choice in the matter. Last time I checked, in America, you can't force employees to join any kind of union or fraternal organization when they have no interest in it. I was also told I wasn't allowed to be publicly involved in any other organization outside the Scouts i.e. Masons or the Republican party (of which I was a member of both).

    Favoritism. Favoritism runs amok; if you're a former Scout, you get away from murder but female employees and males with no Scouting background get treated the worst. I came in right after the membership policy changed and management refused to recognize that that decision was effecting their fundraising efforts. The rural South doesn't have the money to contribute, and those that do won't because they no longer wish to be associated with the BSA. For good reasons.

    And of course, when this was brought up to management, you were told you didn't know what you were talking about.

    Speaking of fundraising, most of that money raised through Friends of Scouting doesn't go back to the packs or troops, but to line the pockets of management and ensure that the budget for the Council is met. The fact they make DEs lie to volunteers and parents about where and how that money raised is use made me physically ill.

    Actually, fundraising shouldn't even be what this was called because it gives a disservice to real fundraising. You're basically a direct-sales marketer, calling past donors and cold-calls alike begging for money. If I wanted to be a telemarketer...

    On my honor, working for the BSA was the worst work experience of my life. I was treated miserably, went home everyday feeling defeated and crestfallen. I've never felt so relieved to leave a company before. Caveat emptor. Take the job only if you like drinking the Kool-Aid. If you blindly tote the organization line, you're fine but any voice of dissent and they will cut you from the herd and let you bleed in the wilderness.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Clean house, get new Scout Executives across the board. Those that are in those positions now are only looking at consolidating power. Also, recognize the facts on the ground: evangelical Christians do not want to associate with you and the economy is effecting your fundraising. Wake-up and face reality. Also, start treating the LDS Church better or you'll see them walk. Finally, stop making your employees contribute to Friends of Scouting out of their paychecks. If not, have fun while the ship sinks into the icy abyss.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

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