EY

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EY Reviews

Updated 26 November 2014
Updated 26 November 2014
4,827 Reviews
3.7
4,827 Reviews
Rating Trends

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EY Global Chairman and CEO Mark Weinberger
Mark Weinberger
846 Ratings

Review Highlights

Pros
  • Policies on flexible-working supports the principle of a work-life balance (in 243 reviews)

  • it's a good place to start your career (max 3 yrs) or good if you have a family (in 106 reviews)


Cons
  • very poor work life balance; not enough staff to meet client needs; quite political (in 701 reviews)

  • Same cons as working at any consulting firm -- you will be work long hours (in 734 reviews)

More Highlights

Employee Reviews

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  1.  

    The better consulting company

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Senior Manager in Melbourne
    Current Employee - Senior Manager in Melbourne

    I have been working at EY full-time (less than an year)

    Pros

    growth plans supported by budget and realistic expectations of hours
    good treatment of employees, starting point to try to make things work for you
    generally speaking displaying the attitudes and atmoshphere as promised in the brochure instead of the usual consulting approach where good things are told to you and then you work 12hrs for the pay of 8.

    Cons

    usual consulting, but they try to minimize the inconvenience for the employees
    lack of or quality of global tooling to share knowledge and previous engagement materials

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    place more effort and focus behind the initiative to drive regional and global approach to project delivery and business development. strategic direction clear, but lack tooling and pragmatics stuff to gain from country experience and materials

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  2.  

    Reasonably positive

    Current Employee - Graduate in Melbourne
    Current Employee - Graduate in Melbourne

    I have been working at EY full-time (less than an year)

    Pros

    Very good environment to learn in and develop new skills.
    People willing to listen and provide advice to support you as a new member of the team

    Cons

    No overtime recognition. Expectation is that you work longer than expected. Expectations can be slightly too high given graduates have very limited experience in providing advice to clients

  3.  

    Senior Associate, IT Advisory

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Senior Consultant
    Former Employee - Senior Consultant

    I worked at EY full-time (more than 3 years)

    Pros

    Exposure to challenging projects
    Networking
    Training
    Personal growth
    Opportunity to work with large clients

    Cons

    Long hours
    No work life balance

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
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  5.  

    Great opportunity for variety of workd

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Advisory Senior Manager in Melbourne
    Current Employee - Advisory Senior Manager in Melbourne

    I have been working at EY full-time (more than 5 years)

    Pros

    Flexibility to work witching your personal life

    Cons

    Potential hrs depending on client requirements

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    People management training would be great

    No opinion of CEO
  6.  

    Good place for anyone

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Consultant in Sydney
    Former Employee - Consultant in Sydney

    I worked at EY full-time (more than an year)

    Pros

    -Wonderful driven people who are supportive and open to new ideas
    -Well known clients
    -Snacks,coffee machines, parties
    -High professional standard
    -Generous with further study assistance

    Cons

    -some work could be repetitive
    -lack of formal training when starting out
    -given there are so many people you really specialise in an area

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    More formal training at junior levels would really improve retention rates.

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  7.  

    EY: Unnecessary Distinctions of Hierarchy

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Learning & Development Coordinator in Sydney
    Former Employee - Learning & Development Coordinator in Sydney

    I worked at EY full-time (less than an year)

    Pros

    Access to gym, options to work from home, internal temps, fantastic IT support - the best IT support I've ever had in a workplace. EY has a 24 number you can call for support and you actually speak with someone! In fact, you can speak with someone even to reset passwords and they action these requests quickly! I found local IT people to be very helpful and on one occasion when I ended up with malware on my computer, they were extremely helpful and not at all aggressive about its removal. I believe EY IT support services have a very good escalation process.

    Cons

    Work life balance was terrible. As a coordinator, I spent many late nights and early mornings in the office and it greatly impacted my home life, personal commitments, study, health, and mental well-being. When I raised these concerns to management, I was basically told to suck it up -- in fact, I was then given half of a second full time role to cover!

    The culture especially in assurance is very dog-eat-dog and it's largely acceptable to treat those under you like slaves. I encountered many partners and senior managers who were not interested in my thoughts or contributions to the team and wanted me to be an unquestioning, unthinking tool of the organisation. It went so far as I heard one senior manager refer to those under him and people employed in Asia as "resources" (not people) and "slave labour". This manager then had a good laugh about how easy it was to dump work on people in Asia and expect them to turn it over in very tight timeframes because they were cheap and unquestioningly dedicated.

    There was a surface level company line that everyone was supported and of course you can always ask for help, but in reality, asking for help made you look weak and incapable. I was often encouraged to share how I was coping with my absurd workload only to have my comments taken out of context and then used against me later in reviews. As a result, I quickly lost my ability to trust management and my personal opinions of my coworkers suffered.

    While EY touts itself as an employer of choice for women, I would have to disagree. They say they are flexible with work. They say they value work life balance and families. They say women have equal opportunities. But the number of times I attended conference calls while partners were driving and kids were screaming in the backseat were too frequent. The truth is that while yes, you can technically work part time and raise a family at EY, expectations of you don't really change. Women still have to work hard and sacrifice their families even if it's not the party line. This isn't work-life balance.

    EY has an absurdly hierarchical culture where rank gives people license to make unreasonable demands on others. For example, a facilitator one rank above you in Learning and Development couldn't carry their own stationary pack to training -- a coordinator would have to come to work early and do it for them (stationary packs are A4 size bags of markers and pens). Nor could facilitators tidy up their own training rooms or return their training materials -- a coordinator would have to stay late to do this for them. On numerous other occasions I was told that no matter how reasonable my suggestions or thoughts were, it wouldn't matter as long as I was a coordinator giving the advice (said to me by management). The workplace had no spirit of collaboration. Instead, interactions were conducted in two ways: either suck up to someone higher and take their word as bible or make it someone else's problem (i.e. someone less important than you).

    There were no growth opportunities for coordinators in L&D. When I interviewed, I was very clear that I would be coming to EY specifically for opportunities to learn and move into a role with more responsibility (I took a demotion and pay cut to join EY), which I was mislead to believe I would have. In reality, there is no upward mobility for coordinators in L&D. Program managers are all seconded from the service lines and even if they promote your rank, your responsibilities won't change (such was the case with one coordinator). Most coordinators burn out and leave within two years. Rank promotions are unlikely to happen any sooner than 3 years into the role and even then, you're still doing the same role.

    The role itself as an L&D coordinator was disappointing. I only ever felt challenged from a workload management perspective, other than that I was not once mentally challenged by my role. It was largely data entry work. Opportunities to up skill were available -- as a reward or a punishment. If you wanted to up skill in anyway in L&D, your options were to either stick it out until you had "proven yourself" or be placed on a performance management plan wherein your skills training was a punishment. Theoretically you could seek out your own training without either scenario, but you would be hard pressed to find time as an L&D coordinator for professional development. I can't imagine it happening without management advocating on your behalf.

    In the end, I was scapegoated for a very poorly managed project and given no warning of poor performance before they decided to replace me. It was much easier to blame the lowly coordinator as unable to perform than for management to accept that they were disorganised, unprepared, making unreasonable demands, and executing poor communication. As I said earlier, coordinators are merely a step above graduates -- you will be the fall guy every time because you don't matter.

    If you are considering Ernst & Young as a potential employer, bear in mind that about 2/3 of all graduates leave the assurance line before they make it to senior manager. It will be a difficult, demanding, life stealing process to get to that level if that's what you desire. People who seem to excel at EY are those who value and are motivated by prestige, brand power, professional power, career success, and find satisfaction in working incredibly hard. There came a point when I looked around me and realised I was fundamentally different from the people in power at EY -- I don't feel proud or satisfied when I pull all-nighters; I mostly just feel tired and resentful.

    In summary, be prepared to work hard at EY. You will need a lot of grit to persevere through many years before you earn a position of any consequence, and you need to be unshakable in the face of criticism. If being yelled at by people in authority over small things affects your sense of self, then this isn't the workplace for you.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Counselor relationships are NOT a replacement for coaching -- an honest discussion about contentment and career progression cannot be had if the one you are confiding in has voting power in your performance review.

    Pay coordinators more -- they put in enough hours and deal with enough demanding people to deserve better compensation for the inevitable stress they will suffer.

    Serious OD work needs to be done in the L&D department where people with the wrong skills are in the wrong jobs. If positions were better matched to people's skills, values, and passions, L&D would see far less turnover and increased work satisfaction. Management always says, "Coordinators don't want to be coordinators forever," and yet there are no options to progress. Upward mobility for coordinators is shockingly limited -- it's no surprise people leave when it's clear this role is a dead end job.

    There is no unity in L&D and there is a thinly veiled "us and them" culture between management and coordinators. Team building would do some good towards overcoming this. So would transparency in decision making and open dialogue that allowed coordinators to express concerns (different from the tokenism mentioned earlier).

    Doesn't Recommend
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  8.  

    Engaging people and opportunities

    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at EY

    Pros

    very friendly and helpful people

    Cons

    same as all the other Big 4

  9.  

    Great people, interesting work

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Senior Manager
    Current Employee - Senior Manager

    I have been working at EY part-time (more than 3 years)

    Pros

    Team, interesting engagement, on the job development, the diversity agenda they talk about is genuine, opportunity to put your hand up and give things a go

    Cons

    Partner politics, long hours, per hour salary not competitive because of long hours, as you move up I performance system is very sales focused - excellence in delivery doesn't get the same weighting in their annual targets

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Let managers and above choose between a sales or delivery focus. Adjust performance system accordingly

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  10.  

    Good training but Firm is sales focused

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Manager in Sydney
    Current Employee - Manager in Sydney

    I have been working at EY full-time (more than 3 years)

    Pros

    Working with the firm will give you good exposure to big clients and very interesting projects. The experience will allow you arguably grow and learn more as oppose to working in commercial organisations.

    Cons

    Despite having a balance score card in evaluating performance, the Firm is still heavily sales focused. It becomes progressively difficult to achieve promotion as you climb the ladder unless you are good in sales.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Develop a culture to properly progress individuals who are technically good but may fall short of being good in sales.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Positive Outlook
  11. 1 person found this helpful  

    Melbourne Performance Improvement - Good potential but currently missing the mark

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Senior Consultant - Performance Improvement in Melbourne
    Current Employee - Senior Consultant - Performance Improvement in Melbourne

    I have been working at EY full-time (more than 3 years)

    Pros

    Working with ambitious and like minded people
    Great brand name
    Great exit opportunities
    Exposure to C-suite executives

    Cons

    Recruitment oversells the role
    Lack of formal and consistent training
    Elitist culture at times
    Staff bookings are made on relationships instead of merit and ability
    Many sub groups and 'Cliques'
    Work load is inconsistent - some months you work around the clock, and other times you are benched for a couple of months at a time.
    Weak pipeline
    Too many graduates, consultants and senior consultants. Not enough work to consistently keep everyone busy. At times new starters and consultants are left to their own devices on the bench without much direction and guidance from senior leaders.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Need to hire staff in line with current project pipeline as opposed to ambitious growth targets.
    Have a plan to keep everyone busy. If there aren't enough billable opportunities then staff should be placed on projects on a 'shadowing' basis to develop new skills and increase personal brand equity within the firm.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

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