IQPC

  www.iqpc.com
  www.iqpc.com
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Good place for young graduates; worst place for experienced job seekers

  • Comp & Benefits
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Senior Management
  • Career Opportunities
Former Employee - Sales Executive in Sydney
Former Employee - Sales Executive in Sydney

I worked at IQPC

Pros

-outstanding sales training
-engagement opp with executive level customers
-fun environment with young culture
-easy to enter
-convenient work location

Cons

-treated as an object
-high turnover rate
-allow very little room for mistakes
- extremely micro managed
-sack you anytime
-frequent change of line manager

Advice to ManagementAdvice

if you invest in your people, keep them and allow them to grow instead of sacking them after probation period

121 Other Employee Reviews for IQPC (View Most Recent)

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  1.  

    Challenging, But Worth It

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in New York, NY (US)
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in New York, NY (US)

    I have been working at IQPC full-time

    Pros

    IQPC gives employees with potential the room to tackle new challenges. This isn't the kind of place where you necessarily have to have done all the facets of the job before in order to be considered. If you're smart and talented, but lack experience, they will give you the opportunity and training to learn new skills. That is what led me here, and I haven't been disappointed. This is a company that values initiative, hard work, moxie, and passion. If you are willing to help yourself, they will help you right back. It's a great place for people to learn the language of business, hone their writing and speaking skills, and really get to know certain industries.

    Cons

    There are a lot of high achieving people here, and they have little tolerance for laziness and under-performance. With the ability to gain a lot (experience, money, promotional opportunities), IQPC expects a lot in return. It's not necessarily a con - it's just a fact that some people may not feel suits them, and that's OK. Not every job or every company is for every personality type. But there are plenty of employees here who have stayed a long time and are very happy here.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Chris Ritchie (head of Sponsorship Sales) is charismatic, energetic, supportive, and a great manager. Keep doing what you do to motivate and train your team! Paul Rocco (head of Delegate Sales) is focused, egalitarian, smart, and similarly motivational. Kate Bentley (Managing Director) is forward thinking, business-savvy, incredibly bright, and demonstrates constant willingness to improve the business through conventional and unconventional strategies. There's still some room for making things better, but this team has what it takes to get there.

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  2.  

    Good for project management skills & enhancing industry knowledge

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Defence Conference Producer in London, England (UK)
    Former Employee - Defence Conference Producer in London, England (UK)

    I worked at IQPC full-time (less than an year)

    Pros

    I worked in the defence production team for just under a year and I believe that this role is ideal for a young grad who enjoys taking the initiative and wants to learn how to take a project from start to finish. Whilst senior management approve what conferences are produced (although topic generation is strongly encouraged), the agenda and direction of each event is entirely down to you. You are trusted to do the research and find the niche for each year, thereby making the conference marketable and sellable. Therefore, in addition to the obvious research side of things, you are given a great deal of responsibility as the conference will succeed or fail depending on the course that you have set it on. Once you have "signed off" the project (when you have acquired enough quality speakers to make the event worth publicising), you move onto to your next event.

    However, this is just the end of the beginning of your work on the first project as you are then responsible for managing it, which involves briefing the other teams (marketing, sales, delegates sales), holding regular meetings to keep up to speed on their progress, and controlling the budget (many conference companies will not allow a fresh grad to do this). The project management was the part of the job I enjoyed most as I was able to work with people from different parts of the business who have different priorities and pressures - being able to achieve their "buy in" to you personally and to your project is of the utmost importance, as without their help, the event will flounder. I was straight out of university when I started this job and was suddenly thrown into a room with a mix of people, some of whom were my own age but most were much older and I was expected to lead the meeting. When you achieve their backing, which can be very difficult as you have to be able to deal with an eclectic mix of personalities, it is tremendously satisfying and when there is a united team working on an event, the whole process goes a lot smoother.

    In terms of your external contact I was given the opportunity to speak with senior business and military leaders from the first day. I have plenty of friends doing to dry consultancy jobs in the city, sitting in front of an excel spreadsheet and that's great for them (personally, I would rather blow my brains out) but this job offers you exposure to some very senior people in your given field from the first day. I would recommend looking at a few of the conferences online and you can see the level of seniority that the company engages with (look at International Armoured Vehicles, or International Fighter). Obviously, you won't be speaking with generals at every event (although it can be done!) as the topics will have an effect on what seniority of officer the military are prepared to send. Some of these senior guys can be difficult to work with but, when you get it right, it's tremendously rewarding.

    In terms of the positive things outside of the immediate job description, the company offers decent training and a clearly set out career path. Also, I realise it's an annoying cliche but there is a good 'work hard, play hard' culture so there is fair amount of socialising after work.

    There are plenty of negative comments on this site and I can't speak for other parts of the business but I enjoyed working in production. There is certainly pressure and it's not for the faint-hearted but there is pressure in every job. For a fresh grad, this will give you a great introduction to project management, time management, and it will enhance your research and interpersonal skills.

    Cons

    Defence conferences are particularly challenging as speaker dropout rates are especially high because of the nature of the beast - if an officer is moved to a different assignment, there is no guarantee that you will get his or her replacement and if he or she is ordered to do something else that week by senior command at the last minute, your conference understandably comes second. Additionally, with reduced budgets, the military are increasingly struggling to attend conferences which poses challenges. The issue for the producer is that you are very much judged on the event you ultimately produce rather than what is on paper. Naturally, some producers are better than others and source replacements when a dropout occurs but sometimes you can still be very unlucky. An event rarely takes place where there isn't at least one dropout which wasn't salvaged. You are then judged both internally (by the sales team) and externally (by the industry sponsors) who are wondering why the person they were there to meet hasn't shown up.

    In terms of the company itself, there can be a tendency to push ideas for conferences for the sake of getting an event into the market at a given time of the financial year. I am all for trying new concepts and I do realise that, as a business, there are certain budgetary targets that have to be met. However, sometimes you can be given a topic which you know is going to tank and the blame for it going wrong will probably rest with you.

    To the company's credit, they do emphasise topic generation to enable new ideas to come through. However, if you are managing let's say 5 or 6 events, the last thing you want to do when you are under pressure is have to do research for another meeting. This is certainly all part of time management but sometimes there isn't enough time in the day, particularly if you prioritise doing the unsaid things that make a good producer (i.e. putting time in with each of your project teams).

    Ultimately, your enjoyment at IQPC will depend on your relationship with your immediate manager as he or she reviews your performance to senior management. I was lucky and had an excellent boss who trusted me to do the job, backed me when I was taking a risk, and still supported me if an idea of mine didn't pay off.

    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
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