What does a Trial Attorney do?

Trial attorneys represent clients or other parties in legal cases and frequently make their arguments in a courtroom setting. If they are in the prosecuting role, they typically work for a government department or entity, whereas other trial lawyers work for businesses or private firms. They oversee depositions, question witnesses, present closing arguments, and guide the overall legal strategy. They provide legal advice throughout the entire process, and may coordinate settlements or pleadings. They also manage appeal proceedings. They conduct extensive research to explore legal precedents.

Trial attorneys must possess a JD degree and be licensed to practice law in their state. They should have extensive courtroom experience and the ability to make a strong, persuasive argument. These roles require excellent research skills, and in-depth understanding of legal strategies and procedures.

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Average Years of Experience

0 - 1
14%
2 - 4
57%
5 - 7
21%
8+
8%

Common Skill Sets

juris Doctorate
Written Communication
Writing
Plaintiffs
Conducting
Advocacy
Well Organized
Problem Solving

Trial Attorney Seniority Levels

Document Review Attorney
3% made the transition
Attorney
52% made the transition
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Trial Attorney Salaries

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