ThoughtWorks FAQ

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27 English questions out of 27

21 September 2020

What is health insurance like at ThoughtWorks?

Pros

- Amazing culture of diversity, inclusivity and equality/equity, you can be yourself, dress the way you want - Amazing people, you'll make tons of friends and massively increase your professional network - Amazing technical reputation and branding within the industry, having TW on your CV makes an impression in the industry, people will constantly ask you about what it was like to work for ThoughtWorks and you'll have instant credibility in technical roles. You'll have lots of solid experience in software delivery, and very transferrable consulting skills. - Highly recommend for graduates to get started with a solid technical foundation for their next industry job, or for people to get ThoughtWorks on their CV - First two years are amazing due to all of the above, you'll make lots of friends, have opportunities to try public speaking, build your personal brand, etc. - Strong benefits, life insurance, critical illness insurance, health insurance, 6 months maternity leave, cycle to work scheme, £800 health fund for certain things, 6% pension, etc.

Cons

- Astonishingly low salaries unless you come in as an external hire, but even then - Astonishingly low annual pay increases (either 1% , 3% or 5% based on performance), then they gaslight you into thinking that 5% is really really really good when that's what you would normally get for average performance outside in the industry. - "Loyalty" tax, home grown graduates get screwed because they'll start at 35-40k, but are only given 3% salary increases, so by the time you have 5 years experience, your pay will only be 46-47k. Outside of TW, someone with 5 years experience would be getting 70k+. If you hand in your notice, then they will offer you a raise, but you shouldn't have to threaten to quit to be compensated fairly. - You are only valued if you are cheap enough for them to make money off billing you out for £1000/day. As soon as you ask for a pay increase, your value to TW starts to diminish because it means they can make less money off you, this is regardless of your performance, your brand, your network or how good you are. The only way to mitigate this is to get promoted because they'd be able to bill you for more money. TW projects are basically tech sweatshops. - Being trapped because of diversity and inclusion, people are made to believe it's so horrible outside of TW, and so they're afraid to look or consider elsewhere and will accept the low pay. - Boring client projects, majority of TW client work is the same, some legacy system with massive cultural and quality issues, inability to move forward due to technical debt and all the best people quit leaving the worst people behind. The clients who are able to afford TW are all the same, very established, older players who have not been able to keep up technologically. Any project you're on will have a really boring, dull domain with really crap tech, and client people who are probably incompetent and resistant to change, and you'll be dealing with lots of politics ("creating influence") and solving the problems using the same TW playbook. You'll come out with a lot of experience dealing with legacy systems, and very strong software development practices (TDD, CI/CD, XP), but it won't teach you anything about solving actually interesting greenfield technical problems. While you can definitely get an interview, you won't have the deep technical experience required to get into FAANG or any prestigious software developer role unless you already have previous experience, a background in computer science or go out of your way to do it yourself with personal projects. - Networking usually required to get on good projects, what few good projects there are within TW, they will usually go to the consultants that have the strongest internal network (aka friends in high places). It is not uncommon for the most popular consultants to get put together on the best projects, and not uncommon for people to be accepted into projects because they've worked with someone on that team before. This is not a bad thing, but if you are not the type who likes to go out there and make friends, you are likely to be stuck on crap projects in crap locations. - Even with a strong D&I focus, you'll still experience microaggressions because not everyone in TW is fully bought into D&I, especially with the decrease in investment in this area. Additionally, the "women" numbers come from 50%+ diverse graduates, but lots of women end up quitting as they get more experience, so there's still very few tech females in the upper ranks - Average turnover of 3 years, by the time you hit 2 years at TW you'll start seeing people you know personally quit, and these will be people you hold in high esteem and it will make you think about quitting also. People with 3+ years TW tenure tend to be very jaded about the company - No clear career paths for non-technical roles. If you are not a developer at TW, you won't get the same amount of training, support or role clarity. BAs and QAs are frequently roped into doing delivery management. - Politics involved in promotions, there's a limited number of promotions available every cycle, so whether you get promoted depends on who else is asking for a promotion and whether they have a stronger case/support/backing than you.

- Strong benefits, life insurance, critical illness insurance, health insurance, 6 months maternity leave, cycle to work scheme, £800 health fund for certain things, 6% pension, etc.

21 September 2020

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10 May 2019

Does ThoughtWorks pay for a gym membership?

Pros

ThoughtWorks has a great culture and people. They do not treat their employees as resources and that's what you can expect from a people-oriented company. If you are planning to join this company then make a habit of not calling your colleagues as resources. You will find all your colleagues having the same level of (or better) knowledge. In other service-based companies generally, you find a couple of senior folks (or a techie person) working for the entire team and others are just supporting him or vice-versa. This is not the case with TW, you will find everyone putting their effort and working as equal as others in the team. Transparency. We have in-house portals available where you can see the bench (beach) strength as well as projects in the pipeline. In these portals, you can also find the information about the staffing plan. This helps you to choose the project which you find more suitable for you. You will be asked before assigning you to any project. This generally does not happen in other companies. You can easily switch the roles in TW. A lot of people converted into dev from QA or BA from QA. If you are interested in non-technical roles like office management, staff management you can easily switch to them. Company support is also good in such scenarios, you will be given opportunities to participate in relevant bootcamp or training programs. You can participate in other activities like conduction hackathon for school kids, participating in social events, geek nights, vodqa etc. Learning, regular training programs, boot comps, geek nights etc. Contribute to the open source projects with other thoughtworkers. Pair programming, dev- box are really good things to know. Unlimited sick leaves. Unlimited food and snacks. No timing. Other benefits like book purchase reimbursement, gym subscription, free health checkup, internet reimbursement etc.

Cons

Initially, you will find difficult to adjust in TW (if not coming to similar background). People are supportive but sometimes they don't pay much attention to new joiners. This depends a lot on your team. You might have to be on the bench very frequently. I do not see much long term projects. Very important, sometimes you might feel that ThoughtWorkers are living in their dream. A few people might judge you before listening to you. They are very used in their culture and will behave like all other companies doing nothing. It is just TWorks who is best in the industry. You will be asked to do networking in the office. You are supposed to meet each and every person from your community. I am not sure why this is required, it is good to have friends in the office but one should not be forced to meet everyone. * A lot of chaos in the office. If you are new joinee, you will find a lot of noise on the floor. Sometimes, I feel like people make more noise than their work. Everyone keeps discussing things with each other which is good but not every time. It seems like a 30min work needed a full day of discussion with the entire team.

Other benefits like book purchase reimbursement, gym subscription, free health checkup, internet reimbursement etc.

10 May 2019

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20 May 2020

Does ThoughtWorks offer a wellness program?

Pros

*Amazing on boarding experience *Awesome people in team *lots of technology putting to gather *Wonderful leaning experience *Feedback culture is amazing *Food quality and employee wellness *No limit to contribute on new technologies

Cons

no cons find till date

Advice to Management

please continue the same as it is

*Food quality and employee wellness

20 May 2020

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21 October 2019

How are the career development opportunities at ThoughtWorks?

Pros

I have met a few great people here that I would want to continue a friendship with outside of work. I feel I'm compensated fairly for my role. The company makes an effort to train and support the skills development of employees. ThoughtWorks is extremely diverse and I've really enjoyed meeting all kinds of talented people here.

Cons

There is no real career path available for designers. ThoughtWorks is a tech first company, who has not demonstrated to me that they value design. This is apparent through lack of design leadership, lack of funds allocation to design initiatives, and lack of interest in career and leadership advancement of designers. For example, design does not get a seat at the table with the tech leaders in the business. There are no design-oriented promotion paths, but there is a strong and clear path of advancement for tech roles. I often feel I get mismatched with opportunities that do not challenge me and are transactional vs. strategic. There is a general lack of teamwork I feel working on projects. Instead, I have experienced divisiveness and argumentativeness on teams, which does not lead to great results or culture experiences. Leadership on projects is distant and uninvolved, so a lot of the time I've felt like there was no one to go to if I was having an issue or needed clarification. I've been told that I'm too introverted to be as successful as I want to be at ThoughtWorks.

Advice to Management

I would love it if ThoughtWorks were to become more design focused. But at least provide equal career opportunities across all the disciplines besides tech. Work to fill leadership vacuums on projects. And pull up a chair for design when it comes to driving key project decisions. Hiring and supporting both introverts and extroverts is a part of diversity. Introverts may not be the loudest voices, but we have different strengths to bring to the table that should be recognized. More training on working as a team, or on diverse teams would be helpful.

There is no real career path available for designers.

21 October 2019

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26 March 2019

What kind of career opportunities exist at ThoughtWorks?

Pros

A lot of opportunity to learn and grow. Liberty to try new ideas.

Cons

A better place for engineers than marketers.

A lot of opportunity to learn and grow.

26 March 2019

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27 English questions out of 27