Ellucian Employee Reviews about "cloud"

Updated 5 Aug 2020

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3.6
72%
Recommend to a Friend
81%
Approve of CEO
Ellucian President and CEO Laura Ipsen
Laura Ipsen
132 Ratings
Pros
Cons
  • "They are struggling to get into the Cloud; too many internal executive politics significantly slowing progress(in 27 reviews)

  • "work life balance is unbalanced(in 26 reviews)

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Reviews about "cloud"

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  1. COVID-19

    "Current State"

    3.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Boston, MA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook

    I worked at Ellucian full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    CEO is one of the best I've worked under: she truly cares about the employees, the customers, the industry.

    Cons

    Early '20 completed staffing the upper management tier with outside people. This team needs to ripen. And, in light of Covid, this will be a huge challenge. While the product works, it is very old and clunky. And, have yet to get their stories right with their multiple product lines even though the merger of the two companies happened 7 yrs ago. They are struggling to get into the Cloud; too many internal executive politics significantly slowing progress.

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  2. Helpful (11)

    "Fake tech company, but could be great with some changes"

    3.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Software Engineer 
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Ellucian full-time

    Pros

    - Coworkers: Coworkers are generally smart and collaborative. Company has recently gotten rid of people who were dead weight. - Comp and Benefits: Generally competitive comp, but highly variable on getting in at the right time. Higher than average PTO, and a benefit that allows taxed reimbursement for certain health or financial purchases. - Team Independence: The company strikes a good balance between team independence and a top-down design decisions. Teams feel free to do research, and share their findings with other teams, but siloing is still a concern. Company has restructured product management recently to reduce conflicts of interest and create better alignment, and seems to be working. - Technology stack: Can be good parts outside of the core ERPs. Higher education is largely legacy software but the company is tackling vitally important problems with its newer offerings. - Mid and low management is actually decent: in the past 12 months this has significantly improved. My manager has been supportive in my development and willing to fight for the team. - Customer dedication: Ellucian is very passionate about their customer base. This is seen with the large number of employees who have significant tenure. -Work/Life Balance: Managers are accommodating of PTO requests, sick leave. Company has a decently sized segment of remote workers and has the collaboration tools to enable this to work for everyone. Crunch time is rare; people generally work 40-50 hours. On-call exists for some teams, but a 3AM missed page would not result in yelling, like other SaaS companies. Important note: Ellucian has a large segment of workers who are helpdesk; things are not as great there.

    Cons

    - Hiring Process: Teams must deal with ‘use it or lose it budgeting’ which results in a mentality of hire-and-fire to gamify budgets, rather than trimming out candidates early in the hiring process to get the right skillset fit. No standardization across teams for types of questions, levels of questions. Company has a difficult time understanding that “you get what you pay for” when hiring and recruiters tend to indiscriminately filter out candidates that would be good for other roles but at a higher rate. Company in the past had hired on people in sprees, then had to manage out low performers picked up in the spree, but has kept some low performers on board to preserve budget. Careers site has been broken, and managers wonder why they don’t get resumes. Company has dropped the ball on referrals, and recruiters don’t promote transparency to candidates on what’s holding up the hiring decision. - Budgeting process and hiring fallout: Unnecessarily dragged out and complex. The lapse in budget approval results in being unable to hire people, thus leaving them able to be scooped up by competitors. There is a lack of incentive for responsible staff planning; in response to this uncertainty, managers tend to spend budget zealously once it is ‘released’, and tend to over-allocate requisitions, then remove or transform requisitions after the opening, which to outsiders gives the impression of phantom roles. Hiring freezes occur later in the year to conserve budget, and requisitions are left open for new applicants. Both of these processes can result in a negative candidate experience as people apply, interview, and are “ghosted” due roles being frozen or reallocated. - Budgeting for cloud infrastructure: Teams need to make estimates for cloud infrastructure budgets for up to 15 months ahead of time, without knowledge of product requirements, estimated customer adoption rates, or necessary architecture changes that would affect infrastructure considerations. Estimates are treated as a promise instead of estimates, leading to unnecessary drama when budgets are exceeded due to unforeseen requirements. This leads to a race-to-the-bottom model where teams iterate on architecture with internal cost in mind rather than customer experience or market suitability. Management tends to ask questions around product cost for individual products while not thinking about the opportunities to reduce overall cost across a set of products. - Training: Budgeting for training or conferences is an arcane process, requiring travel and training estimates to be given up to 15 months ahead of an event. Training budget is also “use it or lose it” so there is a preference to training at the beginning of the year rather than a priority preference, which leads to gamification and unnecessary politics. Industry is moving towards shorter tenures and more junior team members sometimes leave before having the opportunity to do any sort of certification or training. Company would be better off assigning some prepaid funds per-person for training rather than the multi-year binary strategy it currently uses. - Private Equity: Owned by PE means frequent cost cutting. Company seems to want to go to the model of hiring a few key people for architecture that guide a large team of low-cost team members with an assumption that these people can act as an autonomous “software factory”. In the past 6 months, there has been enormous pressure to reduce cost through hiring in India, and management seems to be on a death march to implement this, even though they may not personally agree with that directive. It seems like an eventuality that the only persons in US engineering will be management/figureheads. Already, the company has made the decision to shy away from hiring engineers in the coastal tech hubs; markedly admitting it will not compete with tech companies, while externally marketing itself as on the same caliber. There is a “ramp up and maintenance mentality” where the company tends to hire on new people to build greenfield products, then lay them off when the product is destined for maintenance, which leads to bad feelings if these expectations aren’t stated at the beginning. Company’s project-based mentality is more suited for contracting in some cases, except the company’s budget practices don’t align to hire such personnel. This is heavily seen in stagnation of the company’s ERP products. - Bonus structure: Company relies heavily on base salary for individual contributors, which leads to candidates requesting an overall higher total compensation than for competitors to make up the difference. As a result, there is little incentive for high performance or innovation. Sign-on bonuses are not given due to a budgeting constraint. This can severely impact the marketability of the position for candidates that need that flexibility to make up for lost stock compensation. Company values certainty in cost over anything, which in its extreme form can actually cost the company money. - Leveling: On the junior end, company is not competing with competitors’ offers, which is leading to lopsided attrition in the area which needs growth the most. Almost the entire cohort of new grad hires has left, and the company knows it cannot compete. This has resulted in sporadic intake of R&D interns and no consistent associate pipeline in the US. In some cases, more junior members expressed an interest in staying with the company due to the culture, but felt they had to leave to get a more competitive offer, and matching offers can’t be extended due to budget restrictions. Even more senior people are starting to experience the same issue; new guidelines for levels have effectively prolonged tenure within pay bands. People do want to come back, but administrative burdens only make it a reality after the next budgeting cycle. Company’s job postings that list years of experience do not match with internal guidelines and should be effectively ignored. - Highly territorial: Company tends to reflect its customers in higher education in terms of internal processes: they are a professional services company masquerading as a tech company, and it shows. Some internal processes serve to exert control or create the illusion of control rather than streamline delivery. Company as a whole will go to the cloud kicking and screaming. - Consultant mentality: Being in an IC role is more equivalent to being a consultant than a normal technology role. Being able to come up with an answer quickly along with an exact time estimate is valued more highly than being able to automate a process, use a new tool, or remove a bottleneck that will provide real customer value. Lots of time is spent getting small things in writing solely to cover oneself in case of failure of another party, which can lead to an individualist and tense environment more commonly seen in consulting. - “Quality Readouts” - There are efforts to create a global dashboard of software product quality, and the desire for metrics has caused a lot of stress to people implementing products, who are now more concerned with “looking good” to the metrics which require no defects but changing many things. The same quality metrics are used on legacy products as greenfield products. This has led to negative morale and a reduction in innovation as people want to take the safe route. - Operations model: Company needs to look into equipping operations teams with the tools and skills to be a cloud-first organization. Team complexion and skillsets are aligned into a lift-and-shift model, and this won’t be sustainable. Cloud operations team in its current form adds little value due to skill misalignment, and could be heavily automated.

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  3. "Great Place"

    4.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Other 
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Ellucian full-time

    Pros

    Great place to work

    Cons

    Still growing into the cloud space

  4. Helpful (9)

    "Facade Vs Reality-Stay away"

    1.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonynous 
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No Opinion of CEO

    I worked at Ellucian full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    Just few leftovers and monthly ice cream bonus.

    Cons

    Private small size company- will stay that way. Too frequent reports. Non Managers- no bonuses Professional Nepotism Shipping job overseas. Employees are pitted against each other by low IQ managers. HR turns deaf ears to the employee grievances Poor Health Insurance. Constant changing of Managers and constant adaptation to manager’s tantrums. Cloud Cloud Cloud- but products are 18th century. Customers don’t get buy in with just a glossy work setting and that too is 75 percent empty desks most of the time.

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  5. Helpful (2)

    "Great place to start your career"

    4.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee 
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Ellucian full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    - No micromanaging - Decent benefits for beginners

    Cons

    - Management talks a lot about cloud being the future. But employees supporting traditional solutions are not given enough information.

  6. "Good company to work for"

    4.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Senior Release Engineer in Bangalore

    I worked at Ellucian full-time for more than 5 years

    Pros

    Good teams with stable work.

    Cons

    Moving to cloud was a very confusing rhing, did not have proper organisation

  7. Helpful (10)

    "Director"

    2.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Director in Fairfax, VA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No Opinion of CEO

    I worked at Ellucian full-time for more than 8 years

    Pros

    Colleagues on my team were very supportive; leader in higher education tech space;salary decent

    Cons

    Dysfunctional culture; very political; benefits very expensive; low value toward remote employees; reputation sliding; execs disconnected from frontline employees; weak dev and cloud teams

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  8. Helpful (6)

    "A volatile environment dominated by instability..."

    2.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Sales Professional 
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No Opinion of CEO

    I worked at Ellucian full-time for more than 10 years

    Pros

    Large client base / Leader in Industry --- ripe for the picking

    Cons

    So many management changes, RIF's are routine, unrealistic expectations surround effort to move to Cloud based solutions

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  9. Helpful (9)

    "Cloudy outlook"

    2.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - On Boarding Manager in Arlington, VA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Ellucian full-time for less than a year

    Pros

    Good people. Work from home.

    Cons

    Very long hours and multiple reorganizations. Went through 5 in less than four years. Although you may be able to work from home, expect to work 55 plus hours in the cloud group. Lack of leadership and direction.

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  10. Helpful (4)

    "Coworkers are great but...."

    3.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Consultant 
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No Opinion of CEO

    I worked at Ellucian full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    Amazing coworkers and the ability to travel

    Cons

    The company is going downhill. Sloppy development work means clients are unhappy and consultants are stuck trying to train on buggy software they don't even get trained on themselves. Cloud services is horrible. The clients complain and management gives the clients what they want to hear, again putting consultants in a difficult position trying to keep everything on track. Upper management makes poor decisions about riffs, etc. And don't listen to people who are actually client facing and know what's needed. I was also severely underpaid and overworked for what was expected of me.

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Found 27 reviews