Open Systems International Employee Reviews about "osi"

Updated 12 Nov 2019

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3.7
82%
Recommend to a Friend
81%
Approve of CEO
Open Systems International President Bahman Hoveida
Bahman Hoveida
68 Ratings
Pros
  • "Collaborative work environment, good food, good work-life balance(in 13 reviews)

  • "Free Soda, New building, leading edge technology(in 9 reviews)

Cons
  • "OSI has strong processes in place, which can feel rigid at times, but it also provides clear expectations(in 18 reviews)

  • "Finally I was approached by someone from upper management today to tell me that(in 9 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

Reviews about "osi"

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  1. "Engaging, Fast-Paced, Rewarding"

    5.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Project Manager in Medina, MN
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Open Systems International full-time for less than a year

    Pros

    Fun, fast paced atmosphere with an incredible amount of advancement opportunities The free drinks are really nice and the on-site cafe is delicious.

    Cons

    OSI has strong processes in place, which can feel rigid at times, but it also provides clear expectations.

  2. "Still a great place to work"

    1.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee 
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Open Systems International full-time

    Pros

    OSi employees are way better off than these tiresome posts would seem. The raises are good, the career opportunities are good and you are working on challenging tasks with great colleague and friends. Engineers and software developers run the place but they have the needed skills and customers like them. Non technical staff are well treated too. Sales seem to be booming.

    Cons

    No place is perfect and OSI has some faults. Mostly demanding work and recognition can be hard to find.

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  3. Helpful (24)

    "Don’t stay long"

    1.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee 
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Open Systems International full-time for more than 5 years

    Pros

    Free soda There is a company picnic and a company holiday party each year which are actually quite lavish and nice

    Cons

    I spent a considerable amount of time at osi across multiple positions and waited until I had another job for a decent amount of time before writing this review. Software developers - working at osi is career suicide. You will be working with an outdated code base with bottom of the barrel developers. This is largely due to the low salary osi offers compared to the rest of the industry. Osi takes what they can get since they expect you to leave in a couple years anyway. You will be expected to put in 50 hour weeks and there is very little opportunity to work on anything that will help you appear attractive to any real tech companies. You will spend most of your time maintaining a legacy application that should have been rewritten years ago. Project engineers - according to the CEO you are simply "scada delivery boys" and will be the most overworked and abused employees at the company. A lot of the reviews on here stem from kids who have just graduated college and are getting their first real paychecks so everything is great! However, osi is not a place to build a career. As you become more skilled and put in your time, your workload and travel will increase. Soon you will travel multiple times every month flying out Sunday afternoon and getting back late Friday night with no comp time hence losing more and more of your weekends. The company will literally make you fly out Sunday morning instead of Sunday night if it will save them $50. I should add here that these are most often undesirable travel locations. If you are a real go getter and work harder than your peers, expect to be rewarded with twice the work and the same raises and bonuses as your coworkers who put in the bare minimum. If you do become recognized and get offered the coveted position of supervisor (everyone who lasts more than 3 years will), enjoy your title change since your salary won't. Osi is a revolving door of employees and this is the CEO's business model. The osi mantra is hire new college grads, pay them next to nothing and replace them in 2-3 years when they quit from being burnt out. Osi will not invest in its employees as evidenced by its rejection of its employees wishing to pursue their masters degrees or professional certifications. Not only will osi not help with tuition, they will also threaten to fire you for "not being able to fulfill your duties" if you are unable to travel due to your class schedule. Lastly Osi is petty. A big red flag to you should be the non compete agreement. Osi has gone after ex-employees several times in the past when there was even a chance that they may have violated the non compete Long story short if you have no other options, Osi is an okay place to work for 2 years. Any longer than that and you are sabotaging your career and your earning potential

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  4. Helpful (6)

    "Waste of market leader potential and good talent"

    1.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
     
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Open Systems International

    Pros

    Building is new and clean, looks like an Apple Store. Free pop and decent amenities. I'm adding words here because Glassdoor is saying I need to have at least 20 words worth of pros, which I don't.

    Cons

    OSI is sick environment that is truly worthy of both the praise and criticism they receive. They strive to have a good culture but fail miserably. Middle management is allowed to run the company with this heads up their rears. And senior management is too busy self serving like a fortune 100 in the 90s. They truly are positioned to dominate the market but until Bahman (CEO and founder) gets smart enough to shake things up and hire a real CEO to scale his business, he'll never cross the 75M mark in revenue. A company cannot grow if the employees aren't growing. The revolving door effect is strong at OSI. Those that do stick around bust their tail for at least five years to earn titles such as Supervisor. Unless you're an expert Butt kisser or a blonde, don't expect a promotion. If you're fresh out of college and just need to pay some bills and get a logo on your LinkedIn, by all means you can work here and be satisfied. But I promise in retrospect after you've worked at virtually anywhere else, you'll realize how toxic and wasteful the culture is here.

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  5. Helpful (1)

    "Excellent Opportunities"

    4.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee 
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook

    I have been working at Open Systems International full-time for more than 5 years

    Pros

    OSI is growing quickly which has given me lots of opportunities to grow into a position that fits me and the needs of the company. The work atmosphere is open and positive and my co-workers are fantastic.

    Cons

    With the constant growth there are growing pains, OSI could do better at planning ahead and communicating to employees to offset those pains for their current employees.

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  6. Helpful (35)

    "Worst. Company. Ever."

    1.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Software Engineer II in Plymouth, MN
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Open Systems International

    Pros

    They hire a ton of new grads, which I was, so we all partied together and had a good time outside of work.

    Cons

    Where to start? The pay is HORRIBLE, especially for what you have to put up with A promotion is only something they give out if you are willing to do more work for the same pay, congratulations. People are constantly coming and going through the company. Many are straight up fired for being just terrible at their job. Many more are fired simply because somebody in upper management decided he doesn't like them anymore. Work from home? Forget it. Flex time? You are welcome to come in anytime before 8am and leave anytime after 5pm. A gentleman I worked with was taking evening classes trying to earn a graduate degree. Because of traffic and the location of the school from the office this gentleman needed to leave work at 4:30 two days a week for one semester. He asked his manager if it would be OK for him to come in early those days so that he may leave early. The answer he got was NO. Not only that, but he was also told that OSI's PTO policy states that you can only take PTO in 1 hour increments, so this poor gentleman had to take at least 2 hours of PTO each week because he needed to leave at 4:30. Upper management will walk around to make sure you are in your desk between the hours of 8-5. One day at 4:50pm some of the managers were running around the office telling select people there was an emergency meeting. Only about 20% of the company was "invited" to the meeting. While the meeting was going on, the same managers were new running around unplugging the network cables from those employee's PC's. The "emergency meeting" that happened during the last 10 minutes of the week was to inform them that they were no longer employees. Bahman, the CEO, was actually supposed to be the bearer of bad news. He chickened out and had the HR lady do it for him instead. He left the office before the meeting was over. The following week there was a company meeting held to give the current employees an explanation of what was going on. During that meeting we were all informed that there was going to be another round of layoffs in two weeks so we should all be on our best behavior and prove yourself. Sure enough, two weeks later, they let go another 10-20% of the company. This time, instead of holding an emergency meeting at the end of the day on Friday, they waited until everyone went home Friday evening, and around 6:30pm they started calling employees at their home to inform them they no longer work for the company and that a time had been scheduled the following week for them to come and pick up their severance. I believe this has changed since I was there, but they only did payroll once a month. Yep, you read that right, one paycheck a month. Oh, and when you start, you didn't get your first paycheck until you've completed 30 days of employment, so, depending on where in the month you started, you could go 2 months before you see that first check....and my first one came late. I had to call HR and bring it to their attention that after approximately 6 weeks of employment I hadn't received any money. When I was hired I was negotiating a higher salary. I was told by HR that I would receive a review after 6 months and as long as things were going well, I would be brought up to a more competitive salary. I never received that 6 month review. In fact, my annual review came 6 months late. I received a raise of next to nothing, but the best part is this: To justify my next to nothing raise, the VP pulled out a sheet of paper that had itemized all of the financials that pertain to me. Things like my salary and a list of taxes the company is required to pay to have my as an employee, i.e., social security tax. He totaled this all up and said: This is the real amount we pay for you, so we feel like your compensation is in line with the market. Not long before I moved on, I was sitting at my desk updating my resume to send off to a job application. Some lady suspected I was not working on work stuff so she told her manager on me (yes, a grown adult tattled on my). Even better, her manager (who is now one of the VPs), snuck around the cubicles and jumped out from behind in hopes to catch me! I actually started laughing, I thought it was joke....but it wasn't....he was pissed. I could ramble on with a dozen horror stories like this, but I'll stop there. To sum up, working at OSI was so bad that I had actually contemplated leaving the software development field all together, but thankfully OSI is a one of a kind crappy place and not at all representative of any other company anywhere.

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  7. Helpful (9)

    "Great start out of College, don't stay longer than a year."

    2.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee 
    Doesn't Recommend
    Positive Outlook
    No Opinion of CEO

    I worked at Open Systems International full-time

    Pros

    Great place to start your career. The teams were very close and I admired my coworkers. Great mentorship from certain folks if you are lucky enough to be put on the right team.

    Cons

    Expect to jump ship after about 1 year if you are a new grad. Company relies on revolving door of development talent from new grads. I am thankful for what I learned at OSI but would not advise staying for more than a year if you are a new grad.

  8. Helpful (10)

    "Avoid “Engineering” in Government & Field Automation Services Departments"

    2.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Project Engineer in Medina, MN
    Doesn't Recommend
    Positive Outlook

    I worked at Open Systems International full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    Relaxed work environment, nice office, items in my con list improved over the years but still have a ways to go. OSI’s business strategy in the government group ensures a continual flow of business – they won’t sell OSI software to a competitor so it forces the government to use OSI for maintenance and development services. Complaints in my review are specific to the government and field services departments and I think there are positions elsewhere in the company that would provide a better experience.

    Cons

    Ridiculously slow moving projects, which is is a mixed blame of difficult customers and OSI management. Management tends to turns trivial tasks into behemoth problems, crippling productivity with excessive approvals, reviews, and meetings. Need an extra $5 cable on your project? Expect about 2-3 hours of work filling our paperwork and 2 weeks for all of the necessary approvals to get through to get the cable ordered. There is little transferable knowledge gained, unless you career aspirations are to work at an electrical utility that uses OSI’s software. Most of your time will be spent learning the intricacies of OSI software, developing HMIs in the most painstakingly-slow and buggy software, and tediously going through lists of 1000’s of data points adjusting names to customer ever-changing preferences. Daily I would take a step back and look at what I’m doing and think, ‘this is what I spent 4 years getting an engineering degree for?’ An accumulation of small things gave me a bad vibe about the company. Projects often get down to the contract T&C’s on how to get out of work. I usually felt like we were ripping off the customer, the actual delivered product to cost ratio on a lot of projects was outrageous. OSI really advertised ‘flex time hours’ when I was hired, yet they had the strictest policy of hours I’ve worked at. OSI hires almost all new grads, yet they built their new office 30 miles from the city. Travel policy is a nightmare, expect to get nickel and dimed on expenses. To save $100 on a flight, travel will book you a midday Sunday flight with a 4 hour layover. OSI gave me a 5-day window to accept their job offer which seemed excessively short for a new grad when I had interviews spread out over a month period.

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  9. Helpful (10)

    "Good experience for new developers, bad place to settle down."

    2.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Software Engineer II in Medina, MN
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Open Systems International

    Pros

    OSI is a good place to develop if you're fresh out of college and looking for entry level experience, as there are a lot of opportunities to build strong programming skills and techniques and a lot of talented peers to work with. The company also spares no expense on events, and has a number of fun activities and outings throughout the year to keep things exciting. Several years of experience at OSI will give you a strong resume. The culture is very output focused and will help you learn to be highly productive. The benefits are pretty good.

    Cons

    The systems are limited mostly to C and older .NET versions, so depending on the team you work with, you may not get much experience with cutting edge technologies. Management at OSI has an abundance of whips, but no carrots to be found. They will not hesitate to punish an entire department financially when things are not going smoothly, including the more productive employees. Micromanagement is off the charts, product owners are also VPs, and the CEO sits in developer meetings making decisions about button placement. Lack of knowledge about the customer's needs makes it difficult for teams to be self-sufficient and have any freedom to dictate their own processes. Despite the outcry for for productive employees, OSI appears unwilling to pay for them. New employees struggle to find information, and there aren't enough experienced developers to keep up with knowledge transfer. Salaries for employees with 3-5 years of working experience are quite a bit lower than most other companies for software development in the Twin Cities

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  10. Helpful (13)

    "Abandon hope all ye who enter here!"

    1.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Software Engineer in Plymouth, MN
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Open Systems International full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    An attractive woman in marketing.

    Cons

    Everything. The people: Most but not all of the employees aren't friendly or welcoming to new people. Half the company has been there a long time and so have formed impenetrable social circles. The other half is made up of folks coming into and out of the revolving door they operate due to low pay and the rest of the cons listed here. Management: The CEO will literally walk around the office to make sure you're at your desk by 8 AM. If you're not, you will get reprimanded. Work from home? Forget it. The equipment: Small cube, slow computers. They stick the developers right across from the marketing team, so you better bring your headphones or you'll listen to chatter and blather all day long. Everything from water cooler conversations sans the water cooler to the marketing folks yakking on the phone. The work: Boring. They are very slow to adopt new technology. The work you do isn't recognized or rewarded at all. The company makes a practice of hiring young guns right out of college, paying them very little, demanding a lot, and ensuring that they quit as soon as something better comes along. There's basically no reason to work at OSI unless you are absolutely desperate. In my 13 years of professional experience it's the worst job I have ever had. There's also rampant unfairness in the way they treat employees. Some of the management's pets can sit at their computers playing FarmVille, and nobody says a word. Meanwhile, they would routinely fire other people for "inappropriate use of the internet" (e.g. posting on discussion forums). They will also not hesitate to try and avoid paying unemployment benefits to employees they let go.

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Found 18 reviews