Yelp Employee Reviews about "business owners"

Updated 7 Aug 2020

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3.3
57%
Recommend to a Friend
74%
Approve of CEO
Yelp Co-Founder & CEO Jeremy Stoppelman
Jeremy Stoppelman
1,458 Ratings
Pros
  • "They offer a very good benefits program as well as free food and drink everyday(in 252 reviews)

  • "Great Culture, Fun Environment, Great People(in 188 reviews)

Cons
  • "Calling business owners that have a negative set mindset about Yelp(in 230 reviews)

  • "Sales are drive through cold calls, you'll need to have a growth mindset(in 76 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

Reviews about "business owners"

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  1. "Would not recommend this job to anyone with social awareness"

    1.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Account Executive 
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook

    I worked at Yelp full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    Free food, fun people, great benefits, gym reimbursement, aggressive sales training

    Cons

    Your manager makes or breaks the job, they think you need to eat breath and sleep Yelp, not ethical sales, you tell business owners they won’t reach their daily cap but they can easily triple it, they make it very much so a pack mentality, not treated like an adult at all, not able to take PTO, told to be there early but it is an hourly position so you will not get paid, even the fun stuff is treated like part of your job(mandatory)making it less fun.

    Yelp Response

    August 10, 2020

    We appreciate your feedback and are saddened to hear your time at Yelp was anything less than inspiring. We know that employee perks can only go so far if you don't have a positive relationship with your manager. Yelp encourages employees to take time off from work to refresh and recharge when needed. Unless a pattern develops, it is generally not our intent to discourage an employee from taking their earned PTO. We also want to make sure employees feel comfortable to share their concerns about their work schedule with their managers so we can ensure we're making any reasonable accomodations. We'll be passing up your feedback to our leadership team so we can make sure we're making improvements where it counts! We're thankful for your time at Yelp and wish you the best of luck in the next step of your career.

  2. Helpful (10)

    "Realistically 2 star career"

    2.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Elite Account Executive in New York, NY
    Recommends
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Yelp full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    Incredible stepping stone for future careers in sales. You'll meet some of the best people at this job and those very relationships are what keep you at this company. The sales training I received here is considered some of the best in the industry and I would do it again for the sales experience & training. Amazing parties & happy hours.

    Cons

    Where should I begin: Just to paint a picture I was with Yelp for 3 years and left prior to the furloughs and layoffs (willingly). Having operated at the very low end of the spectrum in the beginning of my career to someone who was a top producer month after month you have to learn how to play the game. Managers will leverage their relationships with you as a means of generating revenue. Once you're off the team/terminated/willingly quit/put your 2 weeks notice in you might as well be dead to them. The product is antiquated & the short sale is glorified(your account only has to stay advertising for 50~ hours for you to receive commission). Keep in mind the product will not work for 90% of the accounts you sign up, even with proper onboarding. Top producing reps and managers know the perfect verbiage to set poor expectations and get the sale in to make sure that the managers are generating revenue. However managers are not paid on how many of the accounts retain rather % to quota/target and how many reps retain org wide (not accounts). The best managers know how to use sympathy ( your "why")to increase performance. Expect a 1 on 1 with your new manager asking you why you work at yelp and who you do it for so they can use this information against you in the future. Yelp preaches that it whole heartedly believes in diversity and inclusion.Yelp YoY also publishes a Yelp blog regarding diversity and yet the numbers reflect a disparity in African American/minority hires into management/leadership or rather the lack thereof since 2014. Something I noticed as well that Yelp will not promote top producing bilingual AE's as a means of keeping them in their chairs to produce revenue. They will however play favorites and put reps who brown nose effectively and may not necessarily have the best sales skills/ social skills & consistently look like (have similar backgrounds & literally look like) the directors and office heads across the org. Those who succeed have a strong drink the kool-aid mentality. The best brown-nosers get the best territories which then in turn yields the best revenue and the best opportunity for a promotion as long as you don't fall into the diversity curve(you'll have a harder time trust me). The culture which can be seen as a pro to some and a con to others. If you like drinking and blacking out often this is the place for you (perfect for college kids as Yelp is known as college 2.0). If you're even a little strange/socially awkward you will not thrive at this company. The Scandals include many managers and directors who were forced to leave due to sleeping with reps to help them with promotions. Sleeping with other people in the office is also frowned upon however the office head is married to the mid market head which makes sense somehow. The best reps coincidentally happen to be on their cell phones often to make calls (to use poor language and lie to business owners), then win the trophy and get shouted out by the office head. The following month most of the accounts don't pay and are left on collections. Some reps are very good at using poor language as well as setting good expectations with other accounts to make sure their account retention doesn't go lower than the 8% which is required to not owe money to Yelp as an AE. Some top producing managers also know that their reps are shady selling and turn the other cheek because this means a bigger check for both parties. During my exit interview all of this was mentioned to the office HR head. She just wrote down notes and after checking in with colleagues months after no changes were ever made.

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  3. Helpful (4)

    "Amazing people / Awful mission statement"

    2.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Account Executive in New York, NY
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Yelp full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    To start - I don't want this to look like a full onslaught against Yelp Inc. The company itself has clearly made a name for itself across the restaurant community and as such as been able to expand to other areas as a result. The pro's and con's that I mention in this review don't only cover my own personal experiences at Yelp (as a white male) but also those experiences of individuals that did not have as loud a voice as I. SO PROS: THE PEOPLE - not the managers or directors, your actual colleagues, those people that sit directly next to you. Those are the people that care about you and the only ones that ever will. I met people here that will be invited to my wedding but I think that could be said for any work experience so I don't necessarily think this is a positive reflection on Yelp or even their TA team (more on them in cons). 2 MONTH INITIAL TRAINING - there's no other sales company that I know of that provides their new hires with a 2-month long training program. While some of this training is done on the floor and on the phones, if I were to compare this to my other sales experiences, the info and prep you receive is lightyears ahead. (the problem is what happens after training, more in cons). ORGANIZATION/CRM/PARTNERSHIPS- Yelp has a direct partnership with Salesforce and Workday as well as other pretty reputable names across HR/Sales tech so most of your internal work needs are going to be pretty accurately fulfilled and you shouldn't have much of an issue training yourself up. I was glad that the company had invested so much in other areas beyond just training.

    Cons

    DIVERSITY & INCLUSION - Not long after I left the company , I did some research on Yelp's Diversity & Inclusion head. I was shocked that I had literally never heard their name in my 3 years at the company. I had initially starting hearing about D&I employees right when I left college in 2015 so this isn't a new thing but I had never thought about the fact that they were extremely underrepresented as a dept head at the company. Go back a few years now, as I began to lean into the job, get better at it and network with my colleagues, I learned that Yelp, like many other entry-level sales companies, had a diversity problem. In my 3 years at the company, there was only 1 non-white director or executive in NYC and while there was a ton of female-representative which I loved there were 0 people of color in leadership positions. This was something that I had personally expressed as a problem to those I felt that I trusted within the company but I never actually made it a point to bring it up as a real issue. To this day, I could tell you that there still isn't a POC (person of color) in a director of sales position at least in NYC (the melting pot of the United States) office. Not only that but there aren't very many in managerial positions either which just doesn't make sense to me when you have a company that's HQ'd in San Fran and literally has a pulse on the demographics of this country. The company needs to make more of a concerted effort to hire poc's. Even the TA team - super white. HR - over the course of 3 years, I only met one HR rep for the entire NYC office 1k+ people. They didn't have the greatest reputation amongst employees and my experiences with them were basically making appointments to speak with them about very small one-off conversation type of things. In my exit interview, I did not feel as though the grievances and issues I brought up to them actually were heard and I can tell many other people feel this way. There were also rumors and instances of sexual harassment and abuse that would go around the office constantly, none which i knew to be true. I would however, expect that company to directly address rumors like that rather than letting them just subside and the people involved to quit or sue. Managers - I had my best and worst manager of my sales career at Yelp. It's very hit or miss. There is a leadership training program that all managers must go through now but it truly just seems like a meeting that they use to see who will speak up the most and drinks the most kool aid. Most of my negative convos at Yelp surrounded around my "why". (why am I working at an entry level job right out of college in NYC.... like is that really a real question). the problem was I wasn't super forthcoming on my why because my why was to get further in my career and make money, I don't need someone to keep reminding me of that at 23 years old living in my first apartment in the city. Most managers DO NOT CARE about you. They only care about THEIR NUMBER. If there is a team of 12 and you each have a quota, they want to hit whatever it would be if you all hit quota. The problem is, this means that 2-4 people on each team get most of the time with their manager and that leads others to failure. And if they don't care about you, why should you care about your clients? The normal sales cycle is usually about 20 mins on the phone and then never speak with them again. Maybe this is why Yelp has such a bad reputation amongst small business owners. Jeremy Stoppelman - It's time to stop whining about Google and actually listen to your clients needs. There were so many interesting ideas and things that I would get on the phone from clients that would never ever be considered. Yelp has spent the better part of the last decade obsessing over how Google has overtaken them. Jeremy's literally came out as saying Google wants them to tank. Maybe if you obsessed more with the people that are spending money with you, you'd be more successful in your mission. Reviews - the whole algorithm is ambiguous and unfair - TELL PEOPLE WHY THEIR REVIEWS ARE BEING REMOVED!

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  4. "People Over Function"

    3.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Account Executive in San Francisco, CA
    Recommends
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Yelp full-time for more than 5 years

    Pros

    - Around many like-minded individuals. Some of my best friends have come from me working at Yelp! They do a great job hiring people of so many different backgrounds - Managers that I've worked with were great at communication. I've never felt like I couldn't tell my managers anything that was on my mind. - Opportunity to continuously learn since the mantra of "the only constant is change". I can easily say to other employers that I know how to successfully sell regardless of any product changes. - Liberal PTO policy. If you had PTO, you have every right to use it (and your manager shouldn't make you feel bad for using it). - No one talks about it, but the benefits are SO good. Probably because college grads don't think that health care coverage is super important (especially if they're on their parents' til 26).

    Cons

    - Over-glorified some sales reps because they were the top in booked revenue in a given month. No one talks about how many cancellations or chargebacks those reps got and it diminished the quality of the deals that some reps with integrity sold. - Promoted reps to managers poorly. I'm sorry, but promoting a 22 year old who sold record breaking sales in 6 consecutive months (which was also their tenure) is NOT a trait that proves success in a manager role. - You do have to sell a little bit of your soul to be successful in the sales role. There will be times that you hear a genuine "no" that disqualifies a business owner from buying ads, but some managers will disregard that and puppeteer you to say some aggressive things. - Upper upper management teaches lower management to put out the fires so they don't have to deal with it. I was lucky and was able to talk to my managers and directors openly, but if I had an idea to go beyond that, they wouldn't do anything to follow up.

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  5. Helpful (1)

    "Fun environment"

    5.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Franchise Account Executive in Scottsdale, AZ
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Yelp full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    Earning potential is unlimited based on your own drive.

    Cons

    Uphill battle having to constantly convince business owners that Yelp is not this corrupt monster of a company.

  6. "Not Sustainable"

    2.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Account Executive in Washington, DC
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Yelp full-time for less than a year

    Pros

    Free food, team outings and etc. Room for advancement as they promote a lot of top performers to management within their first year.

    Cons

    If you don't truly believe in the product you're selling (Yelp Ads), it's a tough job to get behind. Very aggressive selling strategy. You'll call business owners 3-5x a week, who have already been contacted over 100x by different reps. Some have advertised already in the past and lost money. Yelp does not care and will harass them until they sign up again. Go look under Yelp Facebook posts and you'll see the outrage from business owners everywhere. Yelp has ruined its relationship with the public.

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  7. "Great atmosphere"

    4.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Account Executive in Washington, DC
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Yelp full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    Working at Yelp is great, you learn how different businesses need to assert themselves online. Everyone, for the most part, is friendly and encouraging. Managers will always help you grow and take on new roles that interest you.

    Cons

    You cold call all day, speaking to business owners who get called 1000 times a day about different advertising options.

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  8. COVID-19
    Helpful (12)

    "Interesting Year. Will Miss My Friends"

    2.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Account Executive in New York, NY
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at Yelp full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    You will meet a lot of interesting people. It's good experience for entry level sales. Get promoted fast. Sometimes too fast as people who have been there for less than a year get management. Hourly so you never have to work longer hours if not needed I met my bestest friends while working here and I will probably be friends with them till the day I die.

    Cons

    I worked at Yelp for a year and didn't mind the job itself. But the main issue with Yelp is management. Managers have no form of leadership training, just reps who are able to close are now just refreshing Salesforce all day to micro manage your metrics. If managers were picked on Leadership, it would be a different story. But they aren't. So you will more than likely get a manager who has no experience managing a team, and who doesn't have the slight idea on how to handle situations. They are just hired to refresh your metrics all day and that's it. If you want real sales training, you will have to teach yourself. I was most successful at Yelp when I stopped depending on my manager for guidance. And that's sad. You will be micromanaged every day. By your manager, and by your director. Expect to be underappreciated everyday, and to overproduce everyday. And the office is very cut throat. I was lucky enough to know how to use the Salesforce and found every report I needed to understand what was happening day to day. I was always able to see what management was doing in order to bump up numbers for their favorite reps. Whether it be switching out their regions every week, or sending all of your accounts out to top reps, or filtering your region so that you get no new leads. I've seen managers go into reps accounts that have closed on their own, and remove the account owner from getting any credit to then place a favorite rep on their team to get full compensation. And this job is all region. Region pools are not made equally. They can control which pool new leads go into. If you notice you're not getting any, management probably wants you out. For culture, you will meet a lot of people you like. You will hate a lot of people as well. You will be compared to every top rep and it gets old very fast. Once you learn to shut it out, you'll be more successful. And if you think selling with integrity will get you far, it won't. You'll notice a lot of customer reviews about the product you're selling on how they were overcharged, charged in general, or it didn't work. It's because reps and managers close deals with very misleading language that still fall into legal terms. So yes, representatives are usually scamming small business owners in order to get a deal on the board. If you look through Salesforce on all of the top reps accounts, you'll notice a lot of refund approvals, transcripts of what the rep said, and shady sales tactics. If you're on a performance plan, your manager is most likely trying to get rid of you. Time and time again I would see reps who were on performance plans get all of their accounts passed out to the team, or the manager will just call and close it for you. But since only revenue booked by you counts to save your job, those deals will not help you. And I just kept noticing over and over that managers and directors were purposely moving accounts out of reps who were struggling to other reps. I doubt Yelp will ever be the same after massive layoffs. They will probably never rehire to the same amount of reps in the future. And it will have a hard time recovering from this. No executives took a pay cut, nor were management hit as hard as the rest of the employees. Just shows how much management only cares about themselves and not the betterment of the staff. They let go of 2100 young adults to save their own interest. Sad part is I wasn't shocked. I expected it to happen a lot sooner. Yelp was worth 4 billion when I joined, and has dropped to 1.2 billion in one year. If you're looking for a quick job, apply when the pandemic is over. Looking for a serious sales role, look elsewhere.

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  9. "mediocre first job"

    3.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    Former Employee - Associate Account Executive in New York, NY
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Yelp full-time for less than a year

    Pros

    free breakfast/lunch, great benefits, aesthetically pleasing environment, great people and inclusive culture

    Cons

    mundane work load, many business owners (clients) have a preconceived hate towards yelp

  10. Helpful (179)

    "Kelly Clarkson - "Stronger (What Doesn't Kill You)""

    2.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Account Executive in Chicago, IL
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No Opinion of CEO

    I worked at Yelp full-time for less than a year

    Pros

    I apologize if my review is lengthy. I wanted to give as much detail about my experience as possible. Hopefully, my review helps someone. My review is only focused on what I experienced during my time with Yelp, things may have changed since. I was employed by Yelp in the Chicago office from the summer of 2018 to February 2019. I can confidently say it was one of the worst times of my life. My experiences at Yelp mirror a lot of what has already been noted by former and current employees. I, like so many, was grateful to get the call that I had gotten an offer. The thought of working for such a large, well-known tech company was exciting. However, there's a clear distinction, YOU don't work in tech, you work in sales. Welcome to your career. I did not study business or any related major that would lead me to a career in sales. I think most people who end up in sales don't grow up thinking, "I can't wait to cold-call people when I'm older." I had worked in another sales role at another company for about a month where the daily metrics/key performance indicators (KPIs) were 200+ cold-calls, 100+ emails, etc. So, learning that Yelp "only" required about 70 to 80 calls a day and 25 emails was a dream. THAT'S WHERE THEY GET YOU (But more on that later)! In the Chicago office, the BASE is $39,000 (before taxes). Why not $40,000? No one knows. To me, a single twenty-something with no kids, this was enough to afford my modest lifestyle. You will have access to a wellness benefit that can cover your gym membership. Use it. You also receive benefits from day one, which is cool, but not super rare for tech companies and startups. "Plus" there's the possibility of earning commission (But more on that later).

    Cons

    They typically start people on the second week of the month. So that summer, I along with over 90 other people started our career with Yelp. By the time I left the company, a third of my summer group remained. I didn't necessarily see the high number of new hires as a red flag. I figured maybe they wanted to just knock out training for such a large group at once. I came to realize there is such a high turnover with resignations and firings that it's necessary to hire in such high volume. Training is classroom style for two months. The first two months of employment are the most decent. The first week is solely classroom learning and by week two, you're on the phones and "ready" to go! What they don't tell you in the interview (I asked to be sure, given my prior experience at that other company) is about recycled leads. A recycled lead is a lead that has been contacted by prior reps. In some cases, leads have been getting called since 2013. You can imagine they are super excited to hear from Yelp, AGAIN! I understand that in sales, you will have recycled leads, that's a part of the industry. Maybe the prior salesperson didn't sell the product right and this is YOUR chance to say something different to change their mind. Sure, but no, not at Yelp. There is a script (not unlike most sales roles). That's pretty much all the sales language you get. If you come into the role with some experience, you will have a much better time on the phone. If you're pretty much new to sales, good luck. Yelp uses the same exact script for every single business. Calling a contractor? Nail salon? Psychic? Use the script. If you ask your manager (more on that) for valuable feedback or insight on how to approach a certain lead you are not going to get it. Yelp places new hires on teams of about ten. These teams are given a manager who is also in training. YOUR MANAGER IS BEING TRAINED ON HOW TO BE A MANAGER WHILE YOU ARE BEING TRAINED ON HOW TO BE A SALESPERSON. While the job itself is awful, this can truly make or break your experience. If your manager has had previous managing experience, they may actually be able to assist you on your calls. That's often not the case. Most managers are extremely young, which can be a good thing. These are the people that came straight out of undergrad to Yelp, worked as a rep for 1 1/2 to 2 years and then became a manager trainee. Also, it should be noted there is no real trajectory in this role. You work as a Sales Rep for about a year and if you do well you may become a rep for the Mid-Market or National team. Which just means a different volume of cold-calling. Or you could work a year and become a manager in training to manage other people who cold-call. If you survive all of that for years, you may get to be a director. Tough luck if you're a minority though (at least in the Chicago office). Diversity is kind of a problem and an eyesore. There is a "Wall of Fame" where reps who have closed/sold a certain number get their photo (poorly) photoshopped to a European monarch portrait. This is problematic in itself but the only person of color, a Black man, has the smallest photo on this wall. His face is photoshopped onto the iconic "Napoleon Crossing the Alps" and you can barely make out his tiny face in the painting. There are no directors of color and there are few managers of color as well. The overall aesthetic of the office is young, white recent graduates. The environment is very much like a fraternity/sorority house. It can be very cliquey but you will most likely make friends. The people that work alongside you are generally nice, management and leadership are the people to watch out for. You will bond with your friends over how terrible the job is. However, if you leave and they are still employed with Yelp, you will likely not remain friends. Being friends with someone still employed at Yelp is like looking at your friend claim to be “happy” in an abusive relationship. The environment is one of the worst parts of this role. If you have ever experienced any forms of anxiety or depression, you will definitely be triggered. If you are a recovering alcoholic, your sobriety will be challenged. This office has beer kegs (very much like other tech companies). There are "off-site" events that your manager can plan, which basically means go to a bar and drink. You're basically shamed if you don't want to go to these events. On my particular director group, there was an incentive called "Lunch Club." The first six reps to get to 25k in a month get to have Rosé with the director. This office encourages alcoholism as a coping mechanism for the high stress of the job. They blast music loudly, which doesn’t have to be a bad thing. Please be prepared to hear the same songs every day, sometimes more than one time in a day. I heard Clean Bandit & Zara Larsson's "Symphony" three times in one day. It's a mediocre song at best, imagine being stressed and getting yelled at by business owners, and having to hear "SYMPHONNNNYYYYYYYYYY," multiple times a day. They also played Kelly Clarkson's "Stronger (What Doesn't Kill You)" daily, how fitting. I'm afraid you're wrong Ms. Clarkson, what doesn't kill you just slowly eats away at you. Reps are given a territory (some have geographic regions) which basically has two areas or cities. In my time there, I went from Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada) & rural Kansas, to Mt. Rushmore, South Dakota & rural Nebraska, to Garland, Texas & Suburban Chicago. These changes happened in six months. You can imagine how frustrating it is to constantly change territories, especially to go from a decent metropolitan area to a tourist attraction that has closed for the season. All reps are treated equal in regards to their assigned territory. It doesn't matter if you have New York City or San Francisco or rural Alabama. You are expected to meet the same KPIs and quota as everyone. Work starts at 8:30 am sharp. If you have a territory in a different time zone as you, oh well. You're still expected to start dialing, even if businesses are closed. I have never been so micro-managed in my life. You're expected to make 80 dials in a day, get 2 pitches (a pitch is when you run through the entire script with a business owner and show them pricing), and close one deal. If you get to lunch time with no pitches, expect your manager to sit down and look at every SINGLE dial you made. Yelp uses Salesforce which gives them multiple reports which allow them to track everything you do, which of course is necessary but it is overused. My manager would sit and say, "You called this restaurant at 10:00 am on Monday, and you called at 11:00 today, did you leave a voicemail? Are you sending an email with every call?" If you get a voicemail when you call a business, you are expected to leave a message and send an email. Imagine calling someone about 6 to 7 times in two weeks (the sales cycle) and leaving the same message and sending poorly constructed email templates. It's harassment. We are encouraged not to use the Do Not Call (DNC) feature in Salesforce. Even if a business owner says, “Please stop calling me! I am NOT interested,” because they didn’t explicitly say “please add me to you Do Not Call list,” you must continue to call and email them. The product doesn't work. Maybe it did a few years ago but the advertising landscape has changed. There are much cheaper and efficient options out there, e.g. Instagram Ads, Facebook Boost Post/Ads, Google Ads. So, trying to tell a hip young nail artist that her Instagram page with 20,000 followers is not as good as a Yelp page is pointless. I have had customers call and complain to me about the product not working. Luckily, I'm a decent human-being, I didn’t over promise like some of the more successful reps do. This role will really mess with your integrity. If you're calling into a rural area, you will feel like crap for forcing a platform on someone who doesn't need it, just to get a sale. Thankfully, there are no contracts, so people can cancel anytime. This will affect your commission should you ever get over that threshold. Reps are only eligible for commission after closing 30k. After that, each month they must reach at least 12k in order to start earning commission. So, you have to close 42k for Yelp before you receive your first commission check of about $120. Commission is paid out separately from your normal salary and also taxed. Most people don’t make it long enough to see commission. Those who do well will note that their commission checks will be affected as their customers cancel their plans. Yelp billed out commission for six months. The highest you could close a business on was a deal worth $540 a month. Yelp assumed they would advertise for six months. $540 X 6 = $3,240 or 3.24k. You would have to close about thirteen “full-comp” deals before you get your first commission check. Of course, there were cheaper plans that would allow for smaller amounts. But reps are really encouraged to push business owners towards spending fifteen dollars a day (or more) so they can get the full-sized deal. Most people stop advertising after realizing the product doesn’t work. It’s cost-per-click (CPC) and does not guarantee any customers. If a contractor has a $23.00 CPC and someone is shopping around for a contractor getting multiple quotes and viewing multiple businesses (like most people do when shopping around). Yelp will charge that business for each click even if it did not result in a job. Because they paid for the “exposure.” When and if you are closing a deal, you have to tell business owners that you will stay in touch with them if they have any questions about their advertising “campaign.” However, my manager encouraged my teammates and I to not answer the phone for customers or to simply give them the inbound support number. This was common practice throughout the office. Once, I sat on a phone with a business owner for thirty minutes and listened to their complaints, they were charge over four-hundred dollars and didn’t get a single client. What are you supposed to say to a small business owner? I simply said, “I’m sorry.” I felt awful and dirty. There is an in-house barista but every drink they have is acidic tasting and quite frankly, they’re rude (I suppose it’s because they are only paid minimum wage). Reps are encouraged to consume copious amounts of espresso to “keep the energy up.” There is also free food in the two kitchens. However, it’s mostly prepackaged food full of preservatives and nitrates. Good luck grabbing a Walmart Ready-Pac salad or frozen hamburger because all employees take their lunch at 12:00 pm. The office has between 650 - 800 people, give or take firings/hiring/resignations. The two kitchens are like war zones. You spend your hour lunch break waiting twenty minutes to use one of the six microwaves. But while you’re waiting for your first check or you’re in-between checks, the food is helpful. Just make sure in between enjoying free coffee, food, and soft-drinks, you don’t use the bathroom too often. Your manager will constantly want to know where you are. There is the option to do overtime, it's not mandatory, but boy if it’s the last day of the month (LDOM) and you’re leaving at 5:30, expect a dirty look. I witnessed the top performer on my team and one of the top performers in my entire group break down in tears. Management took this happy and bright twenty-two-year-old girl and broke her. What can I, a twenty-seven-year-old who has multiple jobs, say to a young girl in her first role? Recent grads are the target demographic for hiring because they are the most vulnerable. They don’t know that a work environment isn’t supposed to be (this) toxic. Another peer on my team had a nervous breakdown (on his birthday), he was also fired a week later (not a lie or embellishment). In fact, in a week’s time, my former team lost five people, three were fired and two quit (another rep and myself). Work isn’t supposed to be “easy” but it shouldn’t be this hard. My manager and director would simply tell reps who were unhappy that they are not trying hard enough. In fact, my director sent out an email with an article about the health benefits of stress. This is an individual who would have group meetings with all the teams under his leadership just to yell at them. He would constantly walk around the floor and scream at people if they looked unhappy. You will be forced to stand up for “power-hours” and no, Yelp does not provide standing desks. In addition to possibly earning commission, you can earn other perks such as McDonalds breakfast sandwiches, Starbucks or Dunkin' Donuts coffee, an off-site with your team to go drink, taking a picture with a musty jersey, or “bragging” rights. So basically, nothing. You will gain or lose weight, depending on how your body handles stress. You will constantly get sick; the stress will make it hard for your immune system. You will age, a year in this role and you will look older and more tired. You will lose motivation to do anything, even on weekends. It will be hard to imagine life before Yelp. Leaving the company has given me such clarity. While applying for other roles, I was given a writing assignment that took me way longer than it should have. I realized that in the months I’d been employed at Yelp, I hadn’t really used my brain for critical thinking. So, after all this you’re still interested in working at Yelp. Best of luck, welcome to your career.

    Yelp Response

    January 17, 2020

    We appreciate your thoughtful and thorough feedback on your experience at Yelp. We're deeply sorry that your time with us was not what you expected. The things you've mentioned in your review are very far from the experience and overall work culture we work so hard to create here, and its unfortunate that your experience was negative. We go to great lengths during our interview process to set expectations on the challenges of the role, as we never want to spring surprises on anyone on day one. Many tenured employees at Yelp truly enjoy their jobs and find that the continuous challenge is inspiring and helps them grow their skill sets. We understand that this environment might not be for everyone, and in some cases, can be overwhelming. We wish we would have had the opportunity to hear your concerns during your time here, and we wish you only the best in the next step of your career. Thank you for your time with us, we will pass along your feedback to our leadership team so we can continue to make Yelp a great place to work.

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