Glassdoor Reviews

Updated 3 Aug 2020

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3.8
66%
Recommend to a Friend
61%
Approve of CEO
Glassdoor CEO Christian Sutherland-Wong
Christian Sutherland-Wong
96 Ratings
Pros
  • "There is a lot of respect for your personal time and I think in general Glassdoor offers a good work life balance(in 86 reviews)

  • "Great people, Good pay, Great place to learn(in 49 reviews)

Cons
  • "While there is a tremendous amount of opportunity, there are also quite a few growing pains(in 47 reviews)

  • "Commute can be lengthy since the Mill Valley office is in North Bay(in 23 reviews)

More Pros and Cons
  1. Featured Review
    Helpful (3)

    "The cherry on top!"

    5.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - People Team in Mill Valley, CA
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Glassdoor full-time for less than a year

    Pros

    Being an HR Practitioner working in an HR Tech company is a dream; working at Glassdoor where our mission is to help people find a job and company they love is the cherry on top! The People team is transitioning to be much more strategic thought partners to the business, such a great time to be at a company when you can get your fingerprints all over a new way of working! All employees have direct lines of communication to the CEO and everyone in between. We have a super flexible work environment, amazing benefits, open PTO, 401k match...

    Cons

    2020 has brought a lot of changes (to the world) and to Glassdoor; we need to ruthlessly prioritize and focus. It's easy sometimes to get enamored by the bright shiny objects.

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    Glassdoor Response

    July 30, 2020

    We really appreciate you sharing your experience and feedback with us. We are so happy to hear you are passionate about Glassdoor and the direction of your team. We want our employees to see their opportunity for impact within the organization. We understand there have been many challenges and changes this year. As an organization we are working thoughtfully and intentionally to do what is best for our employees and company. We are thankful for your dedication to Glassdoor!

  2. COVID-19
    Helpful (111)

    "A Tough Day. A Tough Day, Indeed."

    2.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Chicago, IL
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Glassdoor full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    I learned more and achieved more in my time at Glassdoor than I did anywhere else I have worked. Amazingly, one of the worst things about Glassdoor made me a stronger sales professional than I ever thought I could become. I suppose I can address those things in the cons section - so there’s your stay tuned. Selling Glassdoor is one of the hardest sales I have experienced. I genuinely believe that if you can sell Glassdoor, you can sell almost anything. That belief will serve me and my 300 laid off colleagues very well in their search for their next play. I will be forever thankful for the amazing friends I made at this company when it still existed as the Glassdoor we knew. Even though that company absolutely died stone dead on May 7th, it felt like a special place. The people on the floor are what made it special. We carried this place on our backs. Invested years of emotional labor in ourselves, our teammates, and our direct reports. We cared more than anyone should have about a company that sells pictures and videos to people for 1000s of dollars. The number of truly talented and wonderful human beings that I worked with and are now unemployed is staggering. I cannot express just how badly Glassdoor messed up by letting these people go.

    Cons

    The reason I was able to achieve even one thing at Glassdoor, is because there is no standardized sales process nor a true enablement team. A sales rep has to hope for a leader who knows how to sell, and that rep had better be a curious person who wants to learn and be willing to lean on your peers. Glassdoor is such a difficult sale with prospects usually upset about ratings, calling it a “rant site”, saying people don’t look at jobs on Glassdoor, claiming users just want to see negative reviews. Those preconceived notions were very hard to sell against. Thankfully, with the help of my great colleagues, I was able to develop my own sales process that helped me overperform and begin seeing success. Eventually, mastering that process and building great internal relationships allowed me to get into leadership where I truly got to see the stunning level of incompetence and miscommunication up close. I’ll try and go department by department. I would post a gif of a tumbleweed for sales enablement if that was allowed. We were each other's sales enablement team. Ironically, not having a true sales process - one where someone can ask “What is the Glassdoor sales process?” and get a very quick, short, concise answer - is what forced me to fend for myself and learn to sell. Enablement was really good at delegating what should have been their responsibilities to the reps and managers. They were also great at being able to string together what few sales events we did have because there was very little budget pretty much constantly. Why didn’t Glassdoor commit to building a world class sales enablement team and roll out a standardized sales process for reps and managers to follow? I’ll never know. But they’re still employed so they must be doing something right. The product itself barely changed in four years. Eventually prospects will stop falling for “we have more traffic this year” when they ask what’s changed since the last time we tried to sell them Glassdoor. Once every year, the product team would tell us about very small changes they were planning to roll out at some point within the next five years. I can’t wait to see the color of the button in 2027. I’m not sure where to start with Sales Development. The name of the org is Sales Development. Develop sales reps. Nurture them. Don’t bully them into low paying jobs that are somehow even harder and more work than hunter and growth roles. The SDR org was a total mess that rewarded good SDRs by “promoting” the most promising inbound reps into a tier where high Enterprise reps belittled them, refused to flip their meetings, and blamed them for any shortcomings that they refused to do anything about themselves. The amount of amazing AEs that came through that org did so through their own sheer will and talent, and frankly not knowing their own value - because these reps could have been making 2x the pay at literally any other sales company. Sales ops is rough at almost every company but I cannot fathom a more inept ops team than the one we had at Glassdoor. Their hallmark was consistently building out nonsensical books, bizarre quotas, and never, ever, ever doing any data refreshing. Here’s an idea - consult the actual front line reps before building out plans that 70% of the reps are going to miss. They finally managed to bring in one very awesome person, who we all loved, and I hope she still has a job. I can’t say her name but anyone reading this knows who I’m talking about. Wingman of the Year and well deserved. Senior Leadership, I just wish I could understand what value you bring. It honestly feels extremely silly that all of the conversations about promotion paths, job families, and arguing attainment vs. competence were something that occupied so much of our time and energy - and they just took it away from us with a snap of their fingers. When I say senior leadership, I mean sales senior leadership. And I mean VP level and up. I could not have asked for a better director who cared more about our people - but above the director was miscommunication, non-communication, false promises, and patchwork solutions. You and ops combined to set us up for failure. A fiscal year where less than 30% of reps and managers were able to hit quarters. The rep participation rates quarter over quarter were shameful. Was it the business or the product? It damn sure wasn’t the people - the managers and reps worked tirelessly to try and bring success to an organization that consistently underpaid and undervalued the talent they had. And now we’re all gone. What a shame. The CEO. Where to begin. When I started at Glassdoor we had Robert. And while Robert wasn’t the business person some CEOs are, Robert was a human being. He spoke his mind. He spoke with conviction. He was entertaining. I found myself wanting to work for him. That’s the very least a CEO can be. When he spoke, everyone listened. At sales kickoff, he was a highlight every year. He even came out to get drinks with the sales team despite his insistence that “sales people are the absolute worst.” Robert, cheers man. I hope you’re enjoying time with League of Legends - but when the decision was made to sell to Recruit, it seems like the writing was on the wall. Enter Christian Sutherland-Wong. When he wasn’t talking about his mum in literally every single all hands address, he was hiding. I don’t know where - maybe hanging out with Indeed executives. He showed up to the Chicago office maybe 2 or 3 times total in his entire tenure as CEO of what used to be Glassdoor. He showed zero ability to command an audience, bragged to us about inventing LinkedIn’s corporate culture when he was there, and did not remotely understand what we do on a daily basis. It’s no surprise he was able to make the call to fire all of us so quickly. I remember (maybe 3-4 months ago) when he came to Chicago to speak to our sales team as we trained our reps how to effectively reach out to CEOs at companies in our books. He stumbled his way through a couple sentences of complete gibberish before exiting the room to a bunch of confused faces. He then came back and read off some words that seemed like they were straight off a marketing slide. He was always saying “people need us now more than ever” as he was putting GD on a hiring freeze of its own and eventually, swiftly, and without warning liquidating the jobs of 300 talented, wonderful people. Not more than a month ago, Christian told us that this was the beginning of our journey of becoming the best tool in the world for job seekers. Either he didn’t know that this was coming, while COVID was already in full swing mind you, or he’s just a liar. Either way the lack of transparency at a company that stresses transparency for OTHER companies has forever been shocking. CEOs are supposed to be able to navigate current times and be able to set up a company for the future. Apparently asking Christian to look a few weeks into the future was too tall of a task. He’s had a very eventful run as CEO of what used to be Glassdoor. If his mission was destroying a company in less than a year, then kudos to you my friend. Job well done.

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  3. Helpful (58)

    "Great people at Glassdoor, but CEO is not trustworthy"

    3.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Senior Account Executive in Chicago, IL
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Glassdoor full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    The people at Glassdoor at truly incredible. They do such a great job hiring inspiration leaders who really care about the success of their people. I always felt supported and never ran out of opportunities to grow.

    Cons

    Ever since the Recruit Holdings acquisition, a common feeling among many employees was, "Are we just going to get swallowed up by Indeed?". We were consistently reinsured by our CEO, Christian Sutherland-Wong that we serve different missions and will operate completely independently. Unfortunately, it feels like the massive round of layoffs was a convenient excuse for Glassdoor to merge with Indeed and our intuitions were correct . They got rid of our very best leaders, presidents club winners, and consistent quota achievers. That shows you where the future of Glassdoor is headed. Wouldn't be surprised if Glassdoor becomes a product Indeed sells soon. Not once did CSW prepare us for this blindside. It seemed as if we were weathering the storm, but out of no where he emotionlessly let 300 people go.

    Glassdoor Response

    May 14, 2020CEO

    Thank you for your feedback. It has been heartbreaking to say goodbye to such talented and good people for reasons that are completely beyond their control and not for a lack of effort or performance. The impact of this decision on each and every person, while necessary to the business, still weighs heavily on me. I hear the disappointment you feel in me. I understand this. And I own it. I also hear your feedback that you feel blindsided by this announcement. I own this too and will seek to learn from this. I want to reiterate that Glassdoor continues to operate as a distinct company and brand, and our mission to help find people a job and company they love is more important than ever. Please accept my deepest thanks for all you’ve done and contributed to Glassdoor. Christian CEO, Glassdoor

  4. COVID-19
    Helpful (80)

    "As transparent as a brick wall."

    2.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Sales in Chicago, IL
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Glassdoor full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    1. The People. I’m sure you’ll see this in the Pros section on each review as of late. I will always be grateful for the friendships I made while working at Glassdoor. 2. The Experience. We did not have a solidified sales process at Glassdoor (see further information below), which in turn pushed us to get creative and to work even harder to see success. This experience will help me in sales roles and sales management roles to come.

    Cons

    I’ve chosen to list my cons by category. I hope you’ll take these seriously. You’ll notice a correlation between some of these cons and Glassdoor’s recently released “Company Values”. 1. “We Are Transparent” is no longer true: Glassdoor is a company that was built on the foundation of transparency. For a while, we were living up to this and maintaining a transparent workplace. However, senior leadership (primarily VPs and above) completely lost sight of this value in the last year or so. I cannot stress this enough - You CANNOT preach the value in transparency to your employees, and then completely hide details of major decisions taking place within the company. For example, Glassdoor leaders, including Christian (CEO) and our Chief Economist, spoke in front of our entire workforce on multiple occasions to reassure us that Glassdoor was going to make it out of these COVID-19 times just fine. They told us we should not be worried, that Glassdoor made financial decisions in the past to prepare for something like this, and that we will protect our people AT ALL COSTS. They then put a surprise meeting on our calendar to lay off 300 employees, including President Club Winners, Top Performers, and some of our most Amazing Leaders. What they (Christian) neglected to even hint at was the fact that they had a different plan for Glassdoor - one that makes the company look a LOT different than it did a week ago. They had a meeting with the entire workforce the day after they laid us off to lay out a detailed restructure plan, with prepared materials, which had to take months or even the whole year to plan out with Indeed. Seems pretty convenient that they used COVID-19 as an excuse to execute a wildly different plan for the company. When Glassdoor was purchased, leadership repeated SO many times that we would not merge or start working too closely with Indeed. It is also unbelievable that Indeed did not lay off any employees - they just took our jobs and Glassdoor didn’t even offer reps/managers the opportunity to stay on the team (again, MANY of these laid off reps/managers were top performers). 2. “We are Innovative” …boy, I wish that were true: There were zero MEANINGFUL changes, advances or additions to Glassdoor’s GTM product suite in years. Sure, we would come out with some small update or addition to our solution from time to time, but it was never a change that prospects/clients deeply cared about. When entering into a discovery call, there was no way I could respond honestly when a prospect would say “I’ve spoken to Glassdoor multiple times. Your team keeps reaching out about new updates. Has your product changed at all or do you have any new products?” It was pretty embarrassing and made it difficult to effectively do the job. 3. “We Are Good People” …well, you used to be: Again, 300 people laid off, NOT based on performance. We are the people that built Glassdoor’s culture DESPITE leadership challenges. We worked incredibly hard for the company, and we made Glassdoor into what it was DESPITE our out of touch leaders. Glassdoor is 1 million percent NOT the same company it was a week ago. If you are attracted to roles at Glassdoor because of the culture, please do not be fooled. The culture will never be the same. The video you see in the first tab of Glassdoor’s Why Work for Us section highlights the people at Glassdoor…Ironically it includes many people who were recently laid off. 4. “We Have GRIT”: Growth: We were expanding, hiring, and looking to move into new offices in San Fran and Chicago. Obviously, COVID-19 impacted this and Glassdoor is no longer growing. Results: Leadership knows how terribly they messed up last fiscal year when they made the books for hunter reps. It was an abomination. They divided books based on “spend potential”, which relied on incredibly inaccurate data in Salesforce. This meant that some of our best reps suffered and barely anyone reached their annual quotas. All we got was a small “sorry this was an oversight”, then the message preached to everyone was “keep working hard” …as if that were the issue. Great leaders and reps left Glassdoor because of how badly leadership messed up and because of the direction the company was going. This happened before layoffs were even in question, so Glassdoor was going downhill this whole past year. Integrity: Most of us feel really let down that Christian and others did not even give us clarity or honesty about how Glassdoor was reorganizing with Indeed - they just blamed everything on COVID-19. This doesn’t ring “integrity” to me. Teamwork: The time it took to make change or get simple projects done was ridiculous. For even the simplest change, we would have to wait on layers of leadership approvals, “leaders” dragging their feet, and conflict between leaders that have MBAs and those who did not delaying the process. It was so frustrating. 5. SDR Org: While the SDR Org made some progress since year’s past, it was still a mess. Leaders having multiple long meetings weekly to try and make change, only to be pushed off by executive leadership as an afterthought. The SDR Org did not get the respect it deserves. These reps are the future of your sales Org, yet you consistently messed up their quotas, did not provide the correct training and enablement to help these reps succeed, and left everything on the managers’ plates to deal with. To all of the former Glassdoor SDRs reading this post: Know that you are incredibly valuable, and you were the lifeline of the sales Org. I’m just sorry executive leadership pushed you to the side. 6. Enablement: Enablement was understaffed and could not provide the resources each Organization needed to succeed. Training and development were left on the shoulders of each manager at Glassdoor. Glassdoor does not have an official sales process or sales methodology. Therefore, SDRs and Reps alike had to work even harder to develop their own process and hopefully be successful. Luckily, this just made me better at my job. However, it is a disservice to your employees to not provide proper training. 7. CEO: Christian took over for Robert as CEO, and things went downhill. Christian has shown on multiple occasions his inability to lead and get “buy-in” from his employees. From leaving meetings early that he was clearly unprepared for, to poorly delivering the news of layoffs, Christian seems to be in over his head. In one meeting, Christian bragged about creating the culture at LinkedIn…it left such a bad taste in so many mouths. Glassdoor is not LinkedIn, and I can promise you Christian had nothing to do with Glassdoor culture when it was strong – that was 100% the employees. 8. Things I unfortunately dealt with while working at Glassdoor: Glassdoor preaches transparency and even released a “Know Your Worth” tool to help candidates calculate what salary they should be making in their given field. This is SO ironic because my colleagues and I were specifically told we shouldn’t talk with one another about how much money we make…at the most “transparent” company around. It turns out this was preached to us because we were not all making the same amount. For example, I was being paid less than 85% of my colleagues. Let this sink in for a minute…I had a longer tenure at Glassdoor than any of those colleagues, I had the most experience at Glassdoor compared to those colleagues, and, like myself, these colleagues had zero management experience before entering into these roles. I was also told I absolutely 100% could NOT negotiate a salary higher than a certain amount, then I come to find 85% of my colleagues were being paid above that amount. Shocking for a company that talks so highly about equal pay for equal work. There were a couple examples of male employees that were acting inappropriately at Glassdoor. I won’t go into the details here, but what I will say was during a full-blown HR investigation into one employee, for whatever reason leadership decided he could stay in the office and continue working while this was going on. Imagine the discomfort, fear, and anxiety this caused the people who were involved in that investigation. For some reason, that always stuck with me. Poorly handled. 9. Important call outs: If you would have asked me to rate Glassdoor 1.5-2 years ago, I would have said 4 stars. I always pictured staying with the company for a long time, and I am grateful to a few of the direct leaders I had that always supported me. Please do not respond to this review with a canned response. Please do not cover mistakes with excuses, and please do not preach about “how well we are being taken care of” post layoffs. A Lot of the information you see above happened before layoffs. Please do not brag about creating an alumni slack channel…most ex-employees are likely too uncomfortable to post in there anyway due to the fact that Christian is in the channel as well. It would be a much more effective channel if people could connect and speak freely with one another.

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  5. "Great place to work"

    5.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Data Scientist 
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Glassdoor full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    I really enjoyed working at Glassdoor.

    Cons

    There were very few negatives working there.

  6. COVID-19
    Helpful (1)

    "Surrounded by great, hard-working people"

    5.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Mill Valley, CA
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Glassdoor full-time for less than a year

    Pros

    - The people are amazingly talented and down to earth. Haven't bumped into too many egos during my time here. - Leadership trusts in employees to get work done without being super hands on. - Flexibility to work from home (even before it was mandatory). - Work can be inspiring, and feels like we're making a difference in our market.

    Cons

    - Information coming down from leadership at the C-Level is sparse, save for monthly company-wide meetings, and the random one off communication. Some teams know about big changes before others that will be impacted greatly by shifts in focus. - Company vision can be muddy at times, especially as the current pandemic situation continues to unfold.

  7. COVID-19
    Helpful (1)

    "Leads with transparency & empathy"

    4.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Product Designer 
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Glassdoor full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    - Employees are given autonomy, flexibility, and trust. I feel trusted to get my work done as well as take care of things in my personal life without guilt. - Leadership is transparent and empathetic when making decisions - Awesome benefits including unlimited PTO, fully covered health insurance, cell phone reimbursement, etc. - An industry leader in response to COVID-19 - mandatory Work from Home was enacted in early March 2020, weeks before other companies took this action. We also got to take office chairs, monitors, and other equipment home or expensed as needed.

    Cons

    - A lot of bumpy change. There's no doubt the past 6 months have been unprecedented, but besides macroeconomic & public health conditions, there's been a lot of internal reorganization. In many cases it felt that leaders were too quick to enact change and didn't consider the possible fallout. - I think it speaks highly of a company that many employees have a long tenure with the company. However, there tends to be an attitude of "we've tried that before" or "that didn't work before" when folks with less tenure make recommendations. New & diverse perspectives should be sought, acknowledged, and valued. - I wish 401k match was more in line with industry standard (full match up to 4%)

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  8. COVID-19
    Helpful (2)

    "A great place for opportunities"

    5.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Lead Front End Engineer in San Francisco, CA
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Glassdoor full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    Transparency is taken to another level here. There's lots of room for career growth, and all the managers that I've worked with are always trying to help you grow. Since covid, Glassdoor was one of the first companies to mandate a work from home, and has been super supportive about flexibility and everyone's situation.

    Cons

    The team structure is constantly changing (which can be a good thing as well), so don't get used to your team, as it will probably change within the next year.

    Glassdoor Response

    July 30, 2020

    Thank you for taking the time to share about your experience with Glassdoor. There is no value more important to us than of Transparency. It is truly our guiding principle. We believe that, in order to push the boundaries of openness and honesty in the workplace, we should ourselves be continuously committed to learning, collaborating and making the right decisions. As you mention, the COVID-19 pandemic presented the opportunity to practice what we've always preached, so it was crucial for us to address safety measures with our employees as early as possible. We're enormously proud of our many teams for their quick work to support our employees remotely. If the COVID-19 pandemic has taught us anything, it's the need to remain agile as a company. While we have taken many steps to communicate structural changes with as much notice to our employees as possible, we can certainly continue getting even sharper. In the coming months, we plan to be more focused than ever on collecting feedback from other employees and making sure our employees feel heard. While we will always remain welcome to change at Glassdoor, our hope is to ensure changes are accompanied with clear communication and employees understand how changes could impact them.

  9. COVID-19

    "Best Company & Culture"

    5.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Senior Business Systems Manager in San Francisco, CA
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Glassdoor full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    Transparency and great communication. Inclusive and embrace diversity.

    Cons

    Lots of pivots and strategy changes due to the pandemic.

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  10. "Greal place to work"

    5.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Manager in Mill Valley, CA
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Glassdoor full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    Glassdoor provides an accelerated learning curve, a great set of team members, and ability to make an impact at work. It is a company that swears by its values and strives towards providing the best employee experience.

    Cons

    The compensation plan is not great

Found 663 reviews