Glassdoor Reviews

Updated 3 Jun 2020

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4.0
75%
Recommend to a Friend
74%
Approve of CEO
Glassdoor CEO Christian Sutherland-Wong
Christian Sutherland-Wong
50 Ratings
Pros
  • "The work/life balance at Glassdoor is also outstanding(in 75 reviews)

  • "Great people, autonomy, opportunities to promotion, and an amazing culture(in 45 reviews)

Cons
  • "While there is a tremendous amount of opportunity, there are also quite a few growing pains(in 47 reviews)

  • "But a contact in the Workplace Experience team said that the Mill Valley office was going to accommodate management and executives, not all(in 23 reviews)

More Pros and Cons
  1. Featured Review
    Helpful (10)

    "A Truly Special Place"

    5.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Account Executive in Chicago, IL
    Recommends
    Negative Outlook

    I worked at Glassdoor full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    My time at Glassdoor was truly amazing! Amazing people, amazing culture, amazing opportunity for growth and to make some good money! Some of my best friends outside of work are my coworkers!

    Cons

    Due to COVID, 300 employees were laid off. This was hard to deal with, especially as leadership was ensuring us that our jobs were safe over the last 3 months. It is what it is though, still an amazing place to work!

    Glassdoor2020-05-11

    Glassdoor Response

    May 14, 2020CEO

    I sincerely thank you for taking the time to write of your positive experience at Glassdoor, even though this is a tough time for you. I am so happy to hear that the people, culture, and opportunity for growth made Glassdoor a special place for you. As a leadership team, we have endeavored to be transparent about company performance through our monthly All Hands and other communication channels. Though, I must acknowledge we’re living in a truly unprecedented time. No one could have foreseen this pandemic or a crisis of this magnitude. In our recent All Hands, I shared with employees that we had seen remarkable impacts to our business due to COVID-19 and unfortunately we saw no signs of improvement, resulting in this very difficult decision. It has been incredibly painful to say goodbye to talented people due to the impact of COVID-19 on our business. I want to thank you for all you’ve contributed during your time at Glassdoor. I hope the connections and relationships you made at Glassdoor don’t end here and continue on. It was a privilege to work with you. Christian CEO, Glassdoor

  2. Helpful (93)

    "A Tough Day. A Tough Day, Indeed."

    2.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Chicago, IL
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Glassdoor full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    I learned more and achieved more in my time at Glassdoor than I did anywhere else I have worked. Amazingly, one of the worst things about Glassdoor made me a stronger sales professional than I ever thought I could become. I suppose I can address those things in the cons section - so there’s your stay tuned. Selling Glassdoor is one of the hardest sales I have experienced. I genuinely believe that if you can sell Glassdoor, you can sell almost anything. That belief will serve me and my 300 laid off colleagues very well in their search for their next play. I will be forever thankful for the amazing friends I made at this company when it still existed as the Glassdoor we knew. Even though that company absolutely died stone dead on May 7th, it felt like a special place. The people on the floor are what made it special. We carried this place on our backs. Invested years of emotional labor in ourselves, our teammates, and our direct reports. We cared more than anyone should have about a company that sells pictures and videos to people for 1000s of dollars. The number of truly talented and wonderful human beings that I worked with and are now unemployed is staggering. I cannot express just how badly Glassdoor messed up by letting these people go.

    Cons

    The reason I was able to achieve even one thing at Glassdoor, is because there is no standardized sales process nor a true enablement team. A sales rep has to hope for a leader who knows how to sell, and that rep had better be a curious person who wants to learn and be willing to lean on your peers. Glassdoor is such a difficult sale with prospects usually upset about ratings, calling it a “rant site”, saying people don’t look at jobs on Glassdoor, claiming users just want to see negative reviews. Those preconceived notions were very hard to sell against. Thankfully, with the help of my great colleagues, I was able to develop my own sales process that helped me overperform and begin seeing success. Eventually, mastering that process and building great internal relationships allowed me to get into leadership where I truly got to see the stunning level of incompetence and miscommunication up close. I’ll try and go department by department. I would post a gif of a tumbleweed for sales enablement if that was allowed. We were each other's sales enablement team. Ironically, not having a true sales process - one where someone can ask “What is the Glassdoor sales process?” and get a very quick, short, concise answer - is what forced me to fend for myself and learn to sell. Enablement was really good at delegating what should have been their responsibilities to the reps and managers. They were also great at being able to string together what few sales events we did have because there was very little budget pretty much constantly. Why didn’t Glassdoor commit to building a world class sales enablement team and roll out a standardized sales process for reps and managers to follow? I’ll never know. But they’re still employed so they must be doing something right. The product itself barely changed in four years. Eventually prospects will stop falling for “we have more traffic this year” when they ask what’s changed since the last time we tried to sell them Glassdoor. Once every year, the product team would tell us about very small changes they were planning to roll out at some point within the next five years. I can’t wait to see the color of the button in 2027. I’m not sure where to start with Sales Development. The name of the org is Sales Development. Develop sales reps. Nurture them. Don’t bully them into low paying jobs that are somehow even harder and more work than hunter and growth roles. The SDR org was a total mess that rewarded good SDRs by “promoting” the most promising inbound reps into a tier where high Enterprise reps belittled them, refused to flip their meetings, and blamed them for any shortcomings that they refused to do anything about themselves. The amount of amazing AEs that came through that org did so through their own sheer will and talent, and frankly not knowing their own value - because these reps could have been making 2x the pay at literally any other sales company. Sales ops is rough at almost every company but I cannot fathom a more inept ops team than the one we had at Glassdoor. Their hallmark was consistently building out nonsensical books, bizarre quotas, and never, ever, ever doing any data refreshing. Here’s an idea - consult the actual front line reps before building out plans that 70% of the reps are going to miss. They finally managed to bring in one very awesome person, who we all loved, and I hope she still has a job. I can’t say her name but anyone reading this knows who I’m talking about. Wingman of the Year and well deserved. Senior Leadership, I just wish I could understand what value you bring. It honestly feels extremely silly that all of the conversations about promotion paths, job families, and arguing attainment vs. competence were something that occupied so much of our time and energy - and they just took it away from us with a snap of their fingers. When I say senior leadership, I mean sales senior leadership. And I mean VP level and up. I could not have asked for a better director who cared more about our people - but above the director was miscommunication, non-communication, false promises, and patchwork solutions. You and ops combined to set us up for failure. A fiscal year where less than 30% of reps and managers were able to hit quarters. The rep participation rates quarter over quarter were shameful. Was it the business or the product? It damn sure wasn’t the people - the managers and reps worked tirelessly to try and bring success to an organization that consistently underpaid and undervalued the talent they had. And now we’re all gone. What a shame. The CEO. Where to begin. When I started at Glassdoor we had Robert. And while Robert wasn’t the business person some CEOs are, Robert was a human being. He spoke his mind. He spoke with conviction. He was entertaining. I found myself wanting to work for him. That’s the very least a CEO can be. When he spoke, everyone listened. At sales kickoff, he was a highlight every year. He even came out to get drinks with the sales team despite his insistence that “sales people are the absolute worst.” Robert, cheers man. I hope you’re enjoying time with League of Legends - but when the decision was made to sell to Recruit, it seems like the writing was on the wall. Enter Christian Sutherland-Wong. When he wasn’t talking about his mum in literally every single all hands address, he was hiding. I don’t know where - maybe hanging out with Indeed executives. He showed up to the Chicago office maybe 2 or 3 times total in his entire tenure as CEO of what used to be Glassdoor. He showed zero ability to command an audience, bragged to us about inventing LinkedIn’s corporate culture when he was there, and did not remotely understand what we do on a daily basis. It’s no surprise he was able to make the call to fire all of us so quickly. I remember (maybe 3-4 months ago) when he came to Chicago to speak to our sales team as we trained our reps how to effectively reach out to CEOs at companies in our books. He stumbled his way through a couple sentences of complete gibberish before exiting the room to a bunch of confused faces. He then came back and read off some words that seemed like they were straight off a marketing slide. He was always saying “people need us now more than ever” as he was putting GD on a hiring freeze of its own and eventually, swiftly, and without warning liquidating the jobs of 300 talented, wonderful people. Not more than a month ago, Christian told us that this was the beginning of our journey of becoming the best tool in the world for job seekers. Either he didn’t know that this was coming, while COVID was already in full swing mind you, or he’s just a liar. Either way the lack of transparency at a company that stresses transparency for OTHER companies has forever been shocking. CEOs are supposed to be able to navigate current times and be able to set up a company for the future. Apparently asking Christian to look a few weeks into the future was too tall of a task. He’s had a very eventful run as CEO of what used to be Glassdoor. If his mission was destroying a company in less than a year, then kudos to you my friend. Job well done.

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    Glassdoor2020-05-11
  3. Helpful (49)

    "Great people at Glassdoor, but CEO is not trustworthy"

    3.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Senior Account Executive in Chicago, IL
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Glassdoor full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    The people at Glassdoor at truly incredible. They do such a great job hiring inspiration leaders who really care about the success of their people. I always felt supported and never ran out of opportunities to grow.

    Cons

    Ever since the Recruit Holdings acquisition, a common feeling among many employees was, "Are we just going to get swallowed up by Indeed?". We were consistently reinsured by our CEO, Christian Sutherland-Wong that we serve different missions and will operate completely independently. Unfortunately, it feels like the massive round of layoffs was a convenient excuse for Glassdoor to merge with Indeed and our intuitions were correct . They got rid of our very best leaders, presidents club winners, and consistent quota achievers. That shows you where the future of Glassdoor is headed. Wouldn't be surprised if Glassdoor becomes a product Indeed sells soon. Not once did CSW prepare us for this blindside. It seemed as if we were weathering the storm, but out of no where he emotionlessly let 300 people go.

    Glassdoor2020-05-11

    Glassdoor Response

    May 14, 2020CEO

    Thank you for your feedback. It has been heartbreaking to say goodbye to such talented and good people for reasons that are completely beyond their control and not for a lack of effort or performance. The impact of this decision on each and every person, while necessary to the business, still weighs heavily on me. I hear the disappointment you feel in me. I understand this. And I own it. I also hear your feedback that you feel blindsided by this announcement. I own this too and will seek to learn from this. I want to reiterate that Glassdoor continues to operate as a distinct company and brand, and our mission to help find people a job and company they love is more important than ever. Please accept my deepest thanks for all you’ve done and contributed to Glassdoor. Christian CEO, Glassdoor

  4. Helpful (69)

    "As transparent as a brick wall."

    2.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Sales in Chicago, IL
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Glassdoor full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    1. The People. I’m sure you’ll see this in the Pros section on each review as of late. I will always be grateful for the friendships I made while working at Glassdoor. 2. The Experience. We did not have a solidified sales process at Glassdoor (see further information below), which in turn pushed us to get creative and to work even harder to see success. This experience will help me in sales roles and sales management roles to come.

    Cons

    I’ve chosen to list my cons by category. I hope you’ll take these seriously. You’ll notice a correlation between some of these cons and Glassdoor’s recently released “Company Values”. 1. “We Are Transparent” is no longer true: Glassdoor is a company that was built on the foundation of transparency. For a while, we were living up to this and maintaining a transparent workplace. However, senior leadership (primarily VPs and above) completely lost sight of this value in the last year or so. I cannot stress this enough - You CANNOT preach the value in transparency to your employees, and then completely hide details of major decisions taking place within the company. For example, Glassdoor leaders, including Christian (CEO) and our Chief Economist, spoke in front of our entire workforce on multiple occasions to reassure us that Glassdoor was going to make it out of these COVID-19 times just fine. They told us we should not be worried, that Glassdoor made financial decisions in the past to prepare for something like this, and that we will protect our people AT ALL COSTS. They then put a surprise meeting on our calendar to lay off 300 employees, including President Club Winners, Top Performers, and some of our most Amazing Leaders. What they (Christian) neglected to even hint at was the fact that they had a different plan for Glassdoor - one that makes the company look a LOT different than it did a week ago. They had a meeting with the entire workforce the day after they laid us off to lay out a detailed restructure plan, with prepared materials, which had to take months or even the whole year to plan out with Indeed. Seems pretty convenient that they used COVID-19 as an excuse to execute a wildly different plan for the company. When Glassdoor was purchased, leadership repeated SO many times that we would not merge or start working too closely with Indeed. It is also unbelievable that Indeed did not lay off any employees - they just took our jobs and Glassdoor didn’t even offer reps/managers the opportunity to stay on the team (again, MANY of these laid off reps/managers were top performers). 2. “We are Innovative” …boy, I wish that were true: There were zero MEANINGFUL changes, advances or additions to Glassdoor’s GTM product suite in years. Sure, we would come out with some small update or addition to our solution from time to time, but it was never a change that prospects/clients deeply cared about. When entering into a discovery call, there was no way I could respond honestly when a prospect would say “I’ve spoken to Glassdoor multiple times. Your team keeps reaching out about new updates. Has your product changed at all or do you have any new products?” It was pretty embarrassing and made it difficult to effectively do the job. 3. “We Are Good People” …well, you used to be: Again, 300 people laid off, NOT based on performance. We are the people that built Glassdoor’s culture DESPITE leadership challenges. We worked incredibly hard for the company, and we made Glassdoor into what it was DESPITE our out of touch leaders. Glassdoor is 1 million percent NOT the same company it was a week ago. If you are attracted to roles at Glassdoor because of the culture, please do not be fooled. The culture will never be the same. The video you see in the first tab of Glassdoor’s Why Work for Us section highlights the people at Glassdoor…Ironically it includes many people who were recently laid off. 4. “We Have GRIT”: Growth: We were expanding, hiring, and looking to move into new offices in San Fran and Chicago. Obviously, COVID-19 impacted this and Glassdoor is no longer growing. Results: Leadership knows how terribly they messed up last fiscal year when they made the books for hunter reps. It was an abomination. They divided books based on “spend potential”, which relied on incredibly inaccurate data in Salesforce. This meant that some of our best reps suffered and barely anyone reached their annual quotas. All we got was a small “sorry this was an oversight”, then the message preached to everyone was “keep working hard” …as if that were the issue. Great leaders and reps left Glassdoor because of how badly leadership messed up and because of the direction the company was going. This happened before layoffs were even in question, so Glassdoor was going downhill this whole past year. Integrity: Most of us feel really let down that Christian and others did not even give us clarity or honesty about how Glassdoor was reorganizing with Indeed - they just blamed everything on COVID-19. This doesn’t ring “integrity” to me. Teamwork: The time it took to make change or get simple projects done was ridiculous. For even the simplest change, we would have to wait on layers of leadership approvals, “leaders” dragging their feet, and conflict between leaders that have MBAs and those who did not delaying the process. It was so frustrating. 5. SDR Org: While the SDR Org made some progress since year’s past, it was still a mess. Leaders having multiple long meetings weekly to try and make change, only to be pushed off by executive leadership as an afterthought. The SDR Org did not get the respect it deserves. These reps are the future of your sales Org, yet you consistently messed up their quotas, did not provide the correct training and enablement to help these reps succeed, and left everything on the managers’ plates to deal with. To all of the former Glassdoor SDRs reading this post: Know that you are incredibly valuable, and you were the lifeline of the sales Org. I’m just sorry executive leadership pushed you to the side. 6. Enablement: Enablement was understaffed and could not provide the resources each Organization needed to succeed. Training and development were left on the shoulders of each manager at Glassdoor. Glassdoor does not have an official sales process or sales methodology. Therefore, SDRs and Reps alike had to work even harder to develop their own process and hopefully be successful. Luckily, this just made me better at my job. However, it is a disservice to your employees to not provide proper training. 7. CEO: Christian took over for Robert as CEO, and things went downhill. Christian has shown on multiple occasions his inability to lead and get “buy-in” from his employees. From leaving meetings early that he was clearly unprepared for, to poorly delivering the news of layoffs, Christian seems to be in over his head. In one meeting, Christian bragged about creating the culture at LinkedIn…it left such a bad taste in so many mouths. Glassdoor is not LinkedIn, and I can promise you Christian had nothing to do with Glassdoor culture when it was strong – that was 100% the employees. 8. Things I unfortunately dealt with while working at Glassdoor: Glassdoor preaches transparency and even released a “Know Your Worth” tool to help candidates calculate what salary they should be making in their given field. This is SO ironic because my colleagues and I were specifically told we shouldn’t talk with one another about how much money we make…at the most “transparent” company around. It turns out this was preached to us because we were not all making the same amount. For example, I was being paid less than 85% of my colleagues. Let this sink in for a minute…I had a longer tenure at Glassdoor than any of those colleagues, I had the most experience at Glassdoor compared to those colleagues, and, like myself, these colleagues had zero management experience before entering into these roles. I was also told I absolutely 100% could NOT negotiate a salary higher than a certain amount, then I come to find 85% of my colleagues were being paid above that amount. Shocking for a company that talks so highly about equal pay for equal work. There were a couple examples of male employees that were acting inappropriately at Glassdoor. I won’t go into the details here, but what I will say was during a full-blown HR investigation into one employee, for whatever reason leadership decided he could stay in the office and continue working while this was going on. Imagine the discomfort, fear, and anxiety this caused the people who were involved in that investigation. For some reason, that always stuck with me. Poorly handled. 9. Important call outs: If you would have asked me to rate Glassdoor 1.5-2 years ago, I would have said 4 stars. I always pictured staying with the company for a long time, and I am grateful to a few of the direct leaders I had that always supported me. Please do not respond to this review with a canned response. Please do not cover mistakes with excuses, and please do not preach about “how well we are being taken care of” post layoffs. A Lot of the information you see above happened before layoffs. Please do not brag about creating an alumni slack channel…most ex-employees are likely too uncomfortable to post in there anyway due to the fact that Christian is in the channel as well. It would be a much more effective channel if people could connect and speak freely with one another.

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    Glassdoor2020-05-14
  5. Helpful (23)

    "Great people, poor leadership"

    4.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Account Executive 
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Glassdoor full-time

    Pros

    The people are truly awesome. Everyone has the opportunity to thrive and get rewarded for doing so.

    Cons

    Aside from the Chief Sales Officer, there is no clear direction/confidence at the top of the org. Strategy has been changed several times. Company is lead by a CEO with zero experience who is unqualified to lead a company through a pandemic. He came from Linkedin and has a Harvard Degree, which is what got him the job.

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    Glassdoor2020-05-11

    Glassdoor Response

    May 14, 2020CEO

    First and foremost, I want to thank you for your contributions to Glassdoor. The people at Glassdoor are truly awesome and I’m glad to hear that was your experience as well. I hear your feedback that you feel we could have done better communicating throughout this crisis. Transparency is something I truly value, and I will seek to learn from this. Please know that I and the leadership team have been focused on giving regular updates about our business through our monthly All Hands and other channels. This unprecedented pandemic and its economic toll has had an incredibly swift impact on our business that we could not have foreseen. It truly breaks my heart to see such talented individuals leave Glassdoor. Thank you for all you’ve done for Glassdoor. Christian CEO, Glassdoor

  6. Helpful (31)

    "Horrible end to a great ride"

    3.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Senior Account Manager in Chicago, IL
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook

    I worked at Glassdoor full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    People: My teammates and leaders were some of the most incredible people I've met. Being in the office surrounded by coworkers I considered my friends felt too good to be true. Every manager I had as well as my director were outstanding leaders, senior leadership on the other hand would fall under the cons. Opportunities: Account Managers typically don't spend more than a year and a half in seat before being promoted. Glassdoor also gave me the chance to work with leaders and provide input to help improve rep work flow and the client experience.

    Cons

    Deceptive: We had constantly asked for clarity around the future of Glassdoor & Indeed. We were blatantly lied to and told that the future plans in question would absolutely not happen. Fast forward a few months and 300 of us are laid off. Our CEO blamed this on COVID while it was later made to seem that this would have happened eventually for the exact reasons we were assured would never happen, and COVID just expedited it. I could not be more frustrated to know that I might still have a job if it weren't for the future plans with Indeed. Glassdoor speaks so highly of valuing its employees but ever since Robert stepped down as CEO that feeling left with him. Glassdoor has grown immensely throughout the years and it was only a matter of time before it made the shift from an enjoyable unique culture to your standard money hungry organization Unorganized: Glassdoors internal processes are a hot mess. I have no idea how this company has been around for 10+ years and has yet to figure out an efficient way to renew clients. They are constantly restructuring the job description of Account Managers and Customer Success and the clients are the ones who are suffering. Getting promoted and transitioning to a new book is beyond sloppy for the rep and client, getting paid out on spiffs always takes 2 months longer than they promise, and anytime another department is looped into an email chain, you can guarantee you or the client will need to follow up at least 3 times to get an answer. I'm not sure if there's a part of this org that I could confidently say runs smoothly.

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    Glassdoor2020-05-12

    Glassdoor Response

    May 22, 2020CEO

    Thank you for sharing your thoughts. I truly am sad that your great ride at Glassdoor ended like this. COVID-19 and the subsequent economic downturn has had a dramatic impact on our business. As such, we recently had to make changes to our business that we would never have expected to make only 3-months ago. I'm sorry to hear you felt we could have done better with communications over this period. While it wasn’t said that layoffs would “never” happen, I fully appreciate that this came as a surprise and a painful one. It’s incredibly important to me that you, and all employees, feel we provide timely and transparent updates on our business and I hear your feedback that you feel we could’ve done better. This is something I take to heart and will take forward with me. We wish you all the best in your career and please do reach out if we can help support you in the future. Christian CEO, Glassdoor

  7. Helpful (40)

    "Lost Sight of Company Values"

    2.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Customer Success in Mill Valley, CA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Glassdoor full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    The people. My team was amazing and everyone was so hard working and easy to work with. My manager was always positive and provided ample guidance and learning opportunities.

    Cons

    Lost sight of the company’s core value, transparency. Pretty ironic for a company that stresses other companies be transparent. When I first started at Glassdoor in the summer of 2019, I took the job mainly because it was so close to my home in Marin. The idea of a 15 minute commute in the Bay Area was a dream come true. About a month later after I joined, we were told we were moving to a new office in San Francisco in the fall of 2020. It felt like a bait and switch. This was never mentioned in any of the multiple interviews for the job but at least I’ll be close to home for some time before the move. We were told they would maintain the Mill Valley office for Marin residents for some time before the lease ended on the building, so I was relieved. But a contact in the Workplace Experience team said that the Mill Valley office was going to accommodate management and executives, not all Mill Valley residents. Thus begins the journey into lack of transparency. Shortly into 2020, many of us were told we were being re-classified as hourly employees and our unlimited PTO was abruptly taken from us. There was an hour long meeting where this was positioned as a legal move that was actually in our best interest. But we all saw through that. Those who took very little time off and were planning a big trip or honeymoon were just left in the lurch. After some bad reviews, a few people leaving the company, and some harsh (but warranted feedback), our PTO was reinstated around March. This eventually did not matter at all as 300 people were laid off in the weeks following. When COVID-19 became a threat to the market and industry, we were told from the onset that we had enough capital to avoid layoffs, that other companies were downsizing. But not us. Throughout February, March, and April we were told our jobs are safe. Even at our sales kick off event, they brought in our chief economist to tell us that we are “weathering the storm” and are positioned to avoid layoffs. This was in mid-April. Fast forward to May 7th where we find an all hands meeting on our calendars with zero notice. In that meeting we were told 300 people, about 30% of the workforce, was being laid off. It was shocking and completely out of left field after what we had been told for months. The icing on the cake was the follow up meeting where we could not ask any questions where our VP said a bunch of corporate speak. There was no exit interview, nothing. Just booted to the curb. Layoffs like this are not just split second decisions, this had to have been considered for some time. So we were lied to and given the false hope, likely for weeks or months, that our jobs were safe. People who have been with the company for years, top performers, and just all around hard working, honest people just lost their jobs in the blink of an eye. Our CEO. He brags about company culture and the important work we’re doing when things were going well. But in moments of crisis or when asked difficult questions, he can’t speak with any sort of confidence. It was pretty easy to tell when we were not being told the full truth. Again, layoffs don’t just get decided without any sort of planning. So he kept telling us that our work is more important than ever all the while steps are being taken to cut the work force behind closed doors.

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    Glassdoor2020-05-13

    Glassdoor Response

    May 28, 2020VP, Customer Success

    Dear CS Alum Thank you for taking the time to share your feedback. Regarding our move from Mill Valley to San Francisco, I can see how this would have been disappointing news for you given the desire to work close to home. I don’t know if your recruiter was specifically aware of the move during your interviews - in any event I’m sorry this was not made clear in that process. I’m not sure how other teams are allocating desks in Mill Valley following the move, but in CS, I plan on implementing “hot-desking”. This would be available to everyone, regardless of level or tenure, so seating will not be restricted just to Managers / Leaders. I understand your concerns in relation to the transition of CS roles to non-exempt. There was no motive behind this change other than ensuring that we meet our legal obligations as a company. Like you, others have also shared the feedback that these changes were not communicated well and I take responsibility for that. I’m glad that we were able to work with HR to establish open-PTO for all non-exempt employees at Glassdoor and address a key underlying concern with these changes. Lastly, I am sorry that the recent layoffs due to COVID-19 caught you by surprise - you’re not alone in that feeling. As a leadership team, reducing headcount in the business was the last thing we wanted to do and we were hopeful that this would not be required - perhaps this influenced the tone or clarity or our communication on business performance. Whatever the reason, I believe I speak for the broader leadership group in saying that we would not have wanted you to have felt caught off-guard in this way and we hear your feedback that we could’ve been clearer. I can imagine it would have been really difficult not having the opportunity to ask questions at the initial announcement, but I hope you had the chance to address all your questions in the follow up meeting with HR. If you still have unanswered questions, please reach out to our HR Team or contact me directly. Thank you for being part of Glassdoor CS. I do wish you all the best for the future. Chris, VP Customer Success

  8. Helpful (11)

    "Not ready for primetime"

    5.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Operations 
    Recommends
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Glassdoor full-time for less than a year

    Pros

    Employees are valued and this can't be overstated. The company really stepped up for those of us who were laid off during covid.

    Cons

    Way too casual atmosphere dulls the business edge to nearly no urgency at all Leadership by committee slows decisions and projects are mired in early stages while everyone has a say in what happens next Overly complex business processes for a simple product concept

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    Glassdoor2020-05-13

    Glassdoor Response

    May 22, 2020CEO

    Thank you for taking the time to leave a review and share your feedback. Taking care of our employees is my first and top priority, so I’m very glad to hear that during your time at Glassdoor you felt valued and that Glassdoor did right by you. I hear and appreciate your feedback on empowering our teams to have greater clarity in responsibilities and be more effective in meetings. Thank you again for being a part of Glassdoor and contributing to our mission. Glassdoor is here for you, please reach out if we can be of help to you. Christian CEO, Glassdoor

  9. Helpful (35)

    "a cloudy glass door"

    2.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Sales in Chicago, IL
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Glassdoor full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    - the people, bar none. this was what made Glassdoor unique and often times when I thought I could see myself leaving, the relationships, people and culture kept me there - upward mobility - there was great opportunity to move up within the org if you're performing, indeed. - benefits + reward - with upward mobility came comp increase and exceeding quota was quite generous and appreciated. benefits were also a perk

    Cons

    - transparency, what we were all about - had once been a pillar quickly became the opposite, indeed. there was no communication around direction other than "we're a branding company now." not much of a plan for the company through these times but leadership clearly already had plans in the works. there was never a mention of layoffs once and 300 people were cut off from anything Glassdoor related within 5 hours! quite harsh, indeed - product innovation - in my 3 years being in direct sales, there was no product innovation. I had sold the same product each year. innovation actually became a new part of the GRIT culture but it seemed to be a few years too late as once a pandemic hit & recession was on the brink, our product was one of the first cut from client's budget --- overall, very curious to see how innovation is incorporated into future product plans because we saw minimal over the last 3 years - sales operations - books were finalized anywhere from 4 to 6 weeks in Q1. as the timer for quota started, books were far off from being settled. sales requests were rarely completed in timely manner... seemed like a lack of headcount and resources able to get the job done as the current SOPs team worked tirelessly day in and day out **what was a pro early on, Recruit Holdings, became a con. same parent company as Indeed, the writing was on the wall and we're seeing it all unfold a bit quicker than we expected

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    Glassdoor2020-05-12

    Glassdoor Response

    May 14, 2020CEO

    Thank you for sharing your thoughts and feedback. It’s much appreciated. Glassdoor is the company it is because of its people and I’m really glad to hear that you felt you were able to grow in your career and felt rewarded for the contributions you made. Glassdoor thanks you! Transparency is not just the basis of Glassdoor’s culture, but also our business. Please know transparency is something I take very seriously and I believe it is a standard we should always hold ourselves to. The world has never seen a pandemic or the economic crisis like COVID-19’s spread around the world has caused. We did aim to provide clear updates on our business through our monthly All Hands and by sharing that we’d seen significant declines in the health of our business, but I hear you feedback that we could have communicated more clearly. This is something I'll be mindful of in the future. I hope you know we are still here to support you. Please don’t hesitate to reach out. Christian CEO, Glassdoor

  10. Helpful (22)

    "Transparency except for when it mattered most"

    3.0
    Former Employee - Account Executive in Mill Valley, CA
    Negative Outlook

    I worked at Glassdoor full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    I debated leaving this feedback because overall, this was the best job I've ever had for a number of reasons. My colleagues were incredible, and my leaders were even more-so. Leadership was genuinely dedicated to development & creating a world-class culture.

    Cons

    When it was clear Covid-19 was going to have a huge impact on the economy, the CEO told us in April that we were making a few small changes (pausing hiring, promotions, etc.) so that we could prevent layoffs. Fast-forward to May, we get an invite on our calendars for 30 minutes out and are told that 300 of us are laid off. Given that transparency is one of our core values, it would've been nice to have had a bit of a warning that this was potentially coming so that we could have prepared ourselves.

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    Glassdoor2020-05-11
Found 603 reviews